Sep 18, 2021  
Fitchburg State University 2013-14 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
Fitchburg State University 2013-14 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

English Studies

  
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    ENGL 2210 - British Literature II: Pepys to Shelley


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course examines British literature from the Restoration, Eighteenth-Century, and Romantic eras (1660-1834). The course considers how ‘classical’ and ‘romantic’ authors think about literary authority, influence, and imagination. It also explores cultural and historical contexts as they shape British literature and thought during these eras, with a focus on issues of race, class, and gender. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  .
  
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    ENGL 2220 - British Literature III: Brönte to Rushdie


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course surveys British writers from the Victorian era to the present, tracing their responses to the revolutionary changes in art, music, science and social and economic classes. Representative authors include Dickens, Eliot, Trollope, Barrett-Browning, Wilde, Shaw, Woolf, Joyce and Beckett, authors whose depiction of human nature challenged contemporary concepts of self and society. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  .
  
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    ENGL 2300 - Literature and Disability


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course examines individual, family and societal images of disability through autobiography, biography, fiction, poetry and children’s literature. Students will explore themes around the disability experience using reflective writings, class discussions and activities. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  .
  
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    ENGL 2320 - Script Writing


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This basic course in script writing for film, television and multi-image productions includes information on the preparation of proposals, treatments, storyboards and scripts. Script formats include documentary, educational, corporate and dramatic film/video writing.(credit is not given for both ENGL 2320 and COMM 2320 .)

    Prerequisite(s):  .
  
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    ENGL 2323 - Digital Journalism


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall.

    What is the future of Journalism? Technology has given journalists new reporting tools and storytelling & strategies; it has also created an interactive news environment that has fundamentally changed the report’s relationship with the public. In this course, students practice digital storytelling skills, while exploring the social, commercial and technological shifts that have shaped the news media in recent years. The end result is a framework for understanding digital journalism’s emerging role in society.

    Prerequisite(s):  .
  
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    ENGL 2330 - Literature and Film


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course involves the critical study of literature and film as means to convey narratives. The conventions of various literary genres and types of films will be considered. Special attention is paid to the adaptation of novels and stories for the screen. Students study a dozen or more motion pictures in depth and compose six to eight critical essays. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  .
  
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    ENGL 2340 - American Political Film and Literature: Conspiracies & Controversies


    3 cr. 3 hr Offered every fourth Semester.

    This course introduces students to divisive American political controversies of the past century and equips them to analyze Hollywood’s representations of these pivotal events, as well as political discourse in literature. In particular, you will examine cinematic and literary portrayals of the political process, labor and class struggles, and real and imagined government conspiracies. This course is writing intensive; students will write several short film analysis papers, as well as two longer, researched analysis papers. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  .
  
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    ENGL 2400 - World Literature I


    3 cr. 3 hr. May be offered less than once every two years. Also offered evenings.

    This course presents a selection of works from around the world, from ancient/classical traditions up to the 16th century. We explore the aspects of the human experience and how they are reflected in the literary traditions of these time periods. Focus is on the Judeo-Christian and Greco-Roman foundations of Western literature, and on the Confucian, Hindu/Sanskrit, Buddhist, and Islamic underpinnings of literature in Asia and the Middle East. ART, GDAN, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  .
  
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    ENGL 2500 - World Literature II


    3 cr. 3 hr. May be offered less than once every two years. Also offered evenings.

    This course examines a selection of major works from the mid-17th century to the present. We cover a wide span of cultures, narratives, and genres from the onset of modernity to the present. Focus is on literatures from a variety of non-western cultures and traditions and on interactions between cultures. By setting up various cultures in conversation with each other, students understand the ways in which modernity shapes itself through considerations of gender, class, race, etc. ART, GDAN, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  .
  
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    ENGL 2540 - Global Issues in Film


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every third semester.

    This course introduces students to crucial global issues of our time, many of which principally concern developing, non-Western nations, but all of which will impact the future of the U.S. Through film viewings, readings, writing, and discussion, students will engage with global problems and learn to develop their own critical viewpoints on complex issues. Students will analyze both documentaries and narrative films as artistic treatments of human problems. Their final project will require an in-depth study of, and presentation on, media representations of global issues pertaining to one nation. This course is cross-listed as IDIS 2540 /POLS 2540 . CTW, GDCN

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2600 - The Bible as Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. May be offered less than once every two years. Also offered evenings.

    The course examines the style, narrative techniques, symbols, and historical settings of the Old and New Testaments. We examine the Bible as a work of literature by thinking about and identifying themes, forms and historical and cultural contexts. We read the Bible in translation and will reflect on how this affects our interpretations. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2620 - Classical Mythology


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every third semester.

    This course is an introduction to mythology, with an emphasis on the myths, epics and plays of ancient Greece and Rome. These may include the works of Homer, Euripedes, Hesiod, Virgil, Ovid and others. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2650 - Ethnic American Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every third semester.

    This course presents works by significant ethnic writers, such as James Baldwin, Maxine Hong Kingston, Zora Neale Hurston, M. Scott Momoday, Toni Morrison and Leslie Marmon Silko. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2660 - 19th Century African American Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fall semester.

    In this course, we will encounter the poetry, fiction, journals, essays, speeches, and songs of nineteenth-century African-American writers. By paying close attention to the personal as well as cultural forms of expression, we will observe how the anguish, joy, and even the mundane aspects of the early African-American experience translate into a distinct canon of literature. Representative authors include Phillis Wheatley, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Frances E.W. Harper, Pauline Hopkins, and W.E.B. Dubois. This course is cross-listed with AAST 2660  ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2670 - 20th Century African American Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every spring semester.

    This course surveys the major periods, genres, and authors of African-American literature in the twentieth century. This course also connects African-American literature to the representation of Blacks in music, film live performance, media, and society in general. Representative authors include James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri Baraka, and Toni Morrison. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2700 - The Short Story


    3 cr. 3 hr. May be offered less than once every two years. Also offered evenings.

    Significant stories by some of the world’s great writers are read and analyzed to show the evolution of the short story form. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2710 - Introduction to Science Fiction and Fantasy


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This course will serve as an intensive introduction to the interconnected genres of science fiction and fantasy. We will read a number of significant authors and texts on three related levels; defining specific formal and thematic elements of each; thinking about some of the main sub-categories and periods through which the genres have developed; and working to develop overall concepts and definitions about the genre’s form, content, and goals. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2720 - Reading Poetry


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    In this course, we will develop techniques to read, understand, perform and appreciate poetry. Through exposure to a wide variety of poetry, we will examine the mechanics of poetic form and also consider the function of poetry in the world, its future and the formation of personal identities through language. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2750 - Detective Fiction


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    The mystery novel/crime story genre is explored through a range of authors and time periods, including stories from Poe to Conan Doyle, classic British fiction, and its distinctively American counterparts, and significant contemporary works. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2800 - Journalism


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This reality-based course covers all aspects of writing news and feature stories for the print media. Students practice techniques used by feature writers, beat reporters and investigative journalists, as well as exploring the many legal and ethical issues faced by those working in news media. (Credit is not given for both ENGL 2800 and COMM 2800 )

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2810 - Editing and Publishing


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every spring semester.

    This class explores the mechanics of editing, issues of attribution, use of sources, balanced coverage and libel laws. In addition, the relationship between editor and writer with reference to agents, the submission and selection process, and collaborating are explored. Students also gain an understanding of writing for special markets, such as education or medicine.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2860 - Introduction to Secondary School Teaching


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall.

    This course is required of all students preparing for the initial license at the secondary level. The course includes a 25 hour prepracticum requirement and is a prerequisite for other certification courses. Students become familiar with the complexities of secondary school English teaching and its demands. The course gives students the opportunity to test their commitment to teaching, and it gives faculty the opportunity to screen students.

    Prerequisite(s): GPA of 2.5.
  
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    ENGL 2870 - The Structure and Nature of Language


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Spring.

    This course studies the history of the English language, theories of language acquisition, and psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic topics. Students will also develop understanding of language systems and grammatical theories. L

    Prerequisite(s): GPA of 2.5.
  
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    ENGL 2890 - Storytelling and the Oral Tradition


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    The course studies the oral tradition in European and non-Western contexts. Students examine the oral tradition in classic works as well as its continuance in fairy tales, popular music, story theater and performance art. Students will consider the structure and presentation of traditional, individually composed and family narratives. Each student will give at least two oral presentations before an audience. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2900 - Children’s Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every semester. Also offered evenings.

    The course serves as an introductory survey of both classic and contemporary children’s literature. Texts are studied from a variety of perspectives in the contexts of both childhood and society. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2910 - Literature for Young Adults


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course is a survey of literature for young adults intended to develop the aesthetic and literary judgment of participants through the study of selected authors and genres. The special challenges and concerns of pre-adolescence through young adults will be explored. Such works as realistic fiction, young adult classics, historical novels, and science fiction will be examined. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2951 - The Grammar Dilemma: Grammar Instruction in the Middle and Secondary School


    3 cr. 3 hr. May be offered less than once every two years.

    Designed for prospective English teachers, students will develop a comprehensive knowledge of English grammar and the pedagogical strategies for helping secondary students develop necessary proficiency in English grammar.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 2999 - Approaches to English Studies


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    An introduction to the academic study of English and the different ways readers can connect to, think about and experience literature. The course provides an overview of the discipline’s issues and theories and gives students experience in writing practical criticism and using research tools and methods. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3000 - World Drama


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every third semester. Also offered evenings.

    This survey course focuses on non-English language Drama across the ages. The works of the Golden Age of Greece, Moliere, Pirandello, Dario Fo, Brecht, great Spanish writers like Calderon, Lope de Vega and Lorca, Japanese masters like Chicamatzu and Kanimi, might be studied in this course. ART, GDAN, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3010 - American Drama


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every third semester.

    This is a survey of American Dramatic Literature from its beginnings in the prerevolutionary British Colonies to the present. The course involves critical reading of dramatic texts. Students will attend productions of plays on and off campus studied in the class. Students will engage in active discussion and analysis of these plays and will be required to write papers on particular authors. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3020 - Modern Drama


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every third semester.

    This course surveys the dramatic Literature and theatre movement from roughly 180 to the present. Students will read and analyze works of Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Brecht and Beckett among others. The class covers such movements as Realism, Expressionism, Surrealism, Absurdist Drama and the Dada movement. ART, GDA, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3025 - English Studies Abroad


    3 cr. 3 hr. As instructor interest

    Special topics taken in a foreign study program.  The topics covered in this course will vary according to the location of the program, duration of travel, and specialty of the respective instructors. Each version of the course will concentrate on the literary culture of the locale of the program and incorporate the value of travel and intellectual inquiry in the experience of reading, writing, performing, and/or teaching. Possible locations abroad include England, Ireland, France, Italy, Germany, the Netherlands, India, the Middle East, South Africa, etc. May be taken more than once for credit with departmental approval. GDA, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  
  
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    ENGL 3030 - The Middle Ages


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This course is an introduction to primary texts of medieval period, c. 500-1500, from both the British Isles and continental Europe, and explores the interconnected literary history of these traditions. Possible readings include the earliest extant Old English epic Beowulf, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Norse sagas, and Malory’s Morte d’Arthur. Genres covered may include epic, history, poetry, mysticism, hagiography, romance, and drama. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3035 - Playwrighting


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every other semester. FIRST OFFERING SPRING 2014

    This course in Playwrighting will teach students the craft and art of Playwrighting for the Stage. The course will have a professional orientation for Theater Concentration Majors but welcomes all serious upper division students as well. The aim of the course is to foster and augment the motivated student to engage in the writing of new theater works in the professional arena. Cross listed with THEA 3035 

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 
  
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    ENGL 3040 - British Literature Since World War II


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This course examines fiction, drama and poetry written in Britain and its former Commonwealth since World War II. Special emphasis is placed on the role imperialism and decolonization has had in literature. Authors examined include A.S. Byatt, Derek Walcott, Wole Soyinka, Salman Rushdie and Michael Ondaatje. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3050 - 20th-Century Irish Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every third semester.

    Students will examine poetry and prose from the entire century of Irish writing in this course. Special emphasis is placed on Joyce and Yeats as major writers whose influence continues to shape Irish writers and thinkers. Other authors covered include Roddy Doyle, Lady Gregory, and Sebastian Barry. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3060 - Modern Poetry


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered once every two years.

    Chief modern poets of America and England are introduced and close reading is encouraged in the lyric form of writers such as Eliot through Lowell, Plath and other end-of-century writers. Emphasis is on these creators as precursors in a tradition. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3061 - Jewish American Literature & Culture


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This course investigates Jewish American participation in the stages of American literary history, but it also examines the larger framing influences that Jewish culture has had on America and the ways in which Jewish Americans have successively reinvented themselves both as Jews and as Americans. Our exploration of Jewish American culture will extend to include attention to the history of Jewish life in America, as well as Jewish contributions to such aspects of the national culture as language, film, music, and diet. ART, GDA, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3070 - European Literature I


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every third semester.

    This class will provide a selective survey of European Literature from the Medieval period to 1800, at time period which lays the foundation for many poetic, prose, dramatic genres of Western literature and which spans many political, social, cultural developments. Special emphasis is given to the development of the novel, women’s writing and the development of a “European” literature and tradition. ART, GDA. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3080 - European Literature II


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every third semester.

    In this course we examine some of the most important recent European works from the past three hundred years. Works read cover not only the different cultures that constitute Europe, but also reflect the changing political landscape that has shaped the landmass that is identified as “Europe.” ART, GDA , LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3090 - Questioning War in Film and Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This course examines the narrative and stylistic conventions of war stories, along with the cultural and political implications of screen images and written accounts of violent conflict and its effects. Our main focus will be films and literature that address the human costs of modern warfare and thereby question war itself. We will explore texts representing the experiences of women as well as men and individuals with a range of national, cultural, and political backgrounds. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3091 - Asian Cinemas: Eastern Visions in a Post Colonial World


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This course is a survey of classic and contemporary Asian film. The history of colonialism and imperialism in South and East Asia, a legacy that figures prominently in the films we will study. Assessing the stylistic and narrative conventions of Indian, Japanese, Chinese, and Korean cinemas, we will recognize how these storytelling traditions often contrast with Hollywood and other Western cinemas. We will become acquainted with the work of some of Asia’s greatest directors. ART, GDAN

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3092 - Transatlantic Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every third semester.

    This course will survey significant works from writers across the Atlantic; that is, writing from and about the Americas, the Caribbean, Africa, Europe, and England. By interrogating canonical and non-canonical writing within the particular context of transatlantic cultural exchanges, the course will consider the ways in which cultural and historical factors shape and change the literary subject. ARTS, GDAN, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3100 - World Novel


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    The course investigates significant novels such as Madame Bovary and Anna Karenina representing various countries and periods, as well as stages in the development of this literary form. L, C

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3120 - Golden Age of English Renaissance Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This course focuses on the poetry, prose and drama of the English Renaissance’s Golden Age, roughly 1530-1625, beginning with poetry of the Tudor period and ending with drama from the reign of the Stuarts. This period encompasses the work of some of the greatest and best-known English authors, lays the foundation for many genres of literature, and encompasses many political reigns and social and cultural developments. The course will examine major literary forms and genres and topical/thematic concerns of writers, linking these to key social, political, and historical developments. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3210 - Major American Writers of the 20th Century


    3 cr. 3 hr. May be offered less than once every two years. Also offered evenings.

    The varied creativity of American writers in this century is explored through the study of fiction, drama, poetry, criticism and the essay. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3220 - American Novel to 1950


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This course provides a close examination of several representative works by major American novelists between 1800 and 1950. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3300 - Women and Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. May be offered less than once every two years. Also offered evenings.

    Literature by and about women is examined in light of their roles in society, at work and in relationships. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
  •  

    ENGL 3460 - Rebels in American Film and Literature: Race, Gender, and Class Outsiders


    3 cr. 3 hr Offered every fourth semester.

    Students in this course will explore significant trends and breakthroughs in Hollywood’s representation of racial minorities, women, gay people, and the incarcerated. You also will read key literary texts by marginalized voices in society and study the work of scholars in the field of representation studies, learning to apply their methods in your own analytical writing. This course is writing intensive; students will write several short film analysis papers, as well as two longer, researched film analysis papers. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3480 - Writing for the Web


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Spring.

    This course combines theory and practice in examining the unique challenges inherent in writing for the World Wide Web. Students learn the conventions, ethics and laws governing various forms of online writing, including online discussion and reviews, blogs, Web pages, wikis, ezines and collaborative fiction. Students then put this knowledge into practice, creating original content for the Web.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3500 - Creative Writing


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    Critical reading and the process of writing are combined in this course, as students write and edit fiction and poetry in a workshop setting. Creative writing techniques are explored; emphasis is placed on the development of a unique, personal voice. Junior standing or approval of the instructor is required to enroll in this class.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3510 - Fiction Writing


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course encourages students to explore the writing processes in a supportive workshop. Students will draft, revise, and complete two short fictional pieces, either short stories or segments of longer works. Writers will receive guidance in refining their use of fictional techniques and will learn to develop voice and theme to create effective short stories and novels. Writing partners and peer editing groups will work together to give and receive useful and compassionate editorial feedback.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3520 - Poetry Writing


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    In this workshop course challenges students to grapple with poetic technique and, in the process, discover their own voices as poets. Students immerse themselves in the traditions of formal verse and write their own poems in a variety of closed and open forms. Students will revise and assemble a selection of their best work for a final portfolio, and contribute to the production of the University’s literary journal, Route 2.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3530 - Fiction Writing II: Time, Tone and Technique


    3 cr. 3 hr. May be offered less than once every two years.

    In this continuation of Fiction Writing (ENGL 3510 ), students further develop their skills as creative writers by exploring techniques for writing short stories and novellas. Technical knowledge of fiction writing basics is expanded and more advanced techniques are practiced, including image patterning, compaction, control of narrative pacing, voice and narrative distance, a sophisticated understanding of time manipulation, creating a credible narrative consciousness within a work.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3540 - Writing Film Criticism


    3 cr. 3 hr. Every fourth semester. FIRST OFFERING SPRING 2015

    In this course students will become more effective film critics by becoming more knowledgeable and literate as film viewers. Film criticism encompasses several different forms of journalistic writing, including the movie review, essay, blog entry, and theoretical article and book. Students will read and respond to the work of pioneering film critics, particularly Pauline Kael and Roger Ebert, as well as view challenging films that push the limits of mainstream and art cinemas and illustrate the difficulties inherent in judging any movie based on personal taste alone. This course is writing intensive: students will write six polished film reviews and one longer analytical paper over the course of the semester. There will also be reading journals and frequent peer review workshops in class, as students will respond to each other’s reviews in writing and in discussion. Our consistent focus will be on film criticism as part of a larger conversation about art and media, rather than an isolated act of self-expression. ART

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 
  
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    ENGL 3551 - Mise en scène


    3 cr. 3 hr Offered every fourth semester.

    This course addresses some broad intellectual problems and themes in play analysis and theater practice. This content represents an effort to acquaint students with the best plays written and produced during specific historic periods, and to engage them in the analysis, criticism, dramaturgy, staging, and performing of some of these plays. ART

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
  •  

    ENGL 3620 - The Classical Tradition in Western Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    An examination of some of the most influential texts of classical antiquity and the subsequent literary tradition that arose in the West. Students will read epics, lyric poetry and drama, which may include selections from Homer, Virgil, Ovid, Horace, Euripedes, Aeschylus, Terence, Seneca, and contemporary works influenced by the classics. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
  •  

    ENGL 3700 - African Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every third semester.

    This course explores a wide range of fiction and literary practices of some leading African writers. The course pays close attention to particular oral, literary and visual strategies used by African writers to create multiple versions of “life” in Africa during pre-colonial, colonial and contemporary times. It also raises and engages a wide range of crucial questions and ideas that pertain to African cultures, politics and societies. ART, GDAN, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3710 - South Asian Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every third semester.

    This course looks at some examples of Anglophone literature that emerged in South Asian countries after their independence from colonial rule. We will examine the literature of these countries to evaluate their adaptation and resistance to Western culture. The first part of the course deals with the theme of “Empire Writes Back,” where colonial representations of the native and the native’s self-representation are examined side by side. The second part of the course delves into other complex issues within the formation of postcolonial identity, such as questions of gender, race, and class within postcolonial discourse. ART, GDAN, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
  •  

    ENGL 3720 - Caribbean Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every third semester.

    In this course, students read and discuss fiction by writers from different parts of the Caribbean to gain insight and broaden their understanding of fiction produced in these Island nations. The course’s focus is on the relationships between culture and society as this fiction is examined against specific historical, cultural and political backgrounds. It also inquires into values associated with questions of identity, family, ideology, etc. ART, GDAN, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3730 - The Illustrated Book and the Rise of the Graphic Novel


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This course explores the history of the illustrated book and the role of illustration in popular literature. We will consider the role of illustration in children’s picture books, wordless novels, the comics and pulp magazines. We will examine, in particular, the development of the graphic novel and other forms that combine sequential art and narrative storytelling. ART

    Prerequisite(s):  .
  
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    ENGL 3830 - College Newspaper Production


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every semester.

    Guided practical experience in content creation, design and production of a biweekly college newspaper. Students fill staff positions as reporters, copy editors, photographers/graphic artists, page designers, production editors, and advertising managers; most students rotate among several staff positions during the semester. Tasks related to copy and production flow mirror those of a mainstream newspaper; effectiveness is gauged by detailed weekly analysis of the ongoing journalistic process and product.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3840 - On-line Magazine


    3 cr. 3 hr. This course may be offered less than once every two years.

    This course provides a close study of significant mainstream and alternative online magazines, uncovering techniques and strategies that students use to produce their own collaborative online publication. Content development, information design, and online production are practiced; in addition, students explore the aesthetic and informational potential of this fast-developing medium.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3860 - Writing for Business and Technology


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    The course is for students interested in writing for business, industry, and technology. Topics covered include creating business proposals, instructions, abstracts, reports and resumes. (Credit is not given for both ENGL 3860 and COMM 3860 )

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3870 - Feature and Magazine Writing


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every semester.

    This reality-based course covers all aspects of developing, writing and marketing feature articles for magazines and trade journals. Students practice interview and research techniques, writing query letters, finding target markets, and crafting articles that demonstrate effective use of slant, theme, voice and viewpoint. (Credit is not given for both ENGL 3870 and COMM 3870 )

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 2800  or COMM 2800 .
  
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    ENGL 3880 - Folklore in America


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    Students will be introduced to the academic discipline of folklore and to a range of cultural traditions found in the United States. Folklore includes traditions that are informally propagated, adaptable to individual innovation and common to cultures around the world. Emphasis will be on verbal forms—i.e. oral traditions studied through textual analysis as a form of literature. ART, GDA, LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 3890 - Creative Nonfiction Writing


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course is an upper-level writing workshop that investigates the linguistic, social, persuasive and literary dimensions of creative nonfiction. Students read and gain experience writing its various sub-genres, which may include memoir, cultural criticism and literary analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200 .
  
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    ENGL 4000 - Major Authors


    3 cr. 3 hr Offered every semester.

    This rotating course explores in depth the works and career of a major author who has made significant contributions to literary tradition. Students gain a unique understanding of literature by tracing out a variety of themes and genres within the author’s major and minor works. Through close attention to a single author students also learn first-hand how biographical, historical and literary contexts come to shape artistic output; the course also includes research and readings in literary criticism on the author.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4010 - Chaucer and His World


    3 cr. 3 hr. May be offered less than once every two years.

    This course focuses primarily on Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales as well as his Troilus and Criseyde and other more minor texts in context of the history and culture of fourteenth-century England. Students learn to read Chaucer’s Middle English and recite it. The Tales are studied both in the framework of the interrelated stories told by the pilgrim characters on the way to Cantebury and individually as they represent various medieval genres and issues of concern and interest to audiences both contemporary and modern. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4012 - Practicum Seminar


    3 cr. 3 hr. Spring semesters concurrent with the Practicum.

    This is a three credit course to be taken in conjunction with the English Studies secondary education practicum (“student teaching”). The purpose of the course is twofold: 1) to support teacher candidate completion of major practicum assessments (the Teacher Work Sample and Pre-Service Performance Assessment); and 2) to use professional collaboration protocols to improve teacher candidate work, especially in the area of classroom management. Students meet once a week throughout the semester. BIOL 4012 , CHEM 4012 , HIST 4012 , MATH 4012 

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Practicum.
  
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    ENGL 4020 - Shakespeare’s Drama: Text and Performance


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Spring.

    This course studies several of Shakespeare’s dramas with a focus on the thematic issues raised by the plays in the texts and in performance. Examination involves not only reading and critical interpretation, but also attention to performance traditions and recent interpretations/adaptation of these works on stage and screen. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4030 - Interpreting Shakespeare’s Work


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall.

    This course will study selected poems and plays from Shakespeare’s canon, examining particularly his treatment of power, love, gender, and the other. We will consider: Who and what is Shakespeare? Why is Shakespeare considered the world’s greatest author? To what purposes have Shakespeare and Shakespeare’s texts been put in literary, historical, ideological, education and cultural terms? How do contemporary readings, films, and production of Shakespeare (re) present Shakespeare? LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4040 - Major English Writers of the 17th Century


    3 cr. 3 hr.

    This course will survey one or more genres, for example, the dramas of Jonson, Webster, Behn and Congreve; the poetry of Milton, Donne, Herbert, Herrick, Marvell, Dryden, Wroth and Phillips; and prose work by Browne, Fell, Astell and Pepys. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4050 - The Novel in the 18th Century


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This course introduces students to some of the rich critical and theoretical traditions surrounding one of the truly great modern literary forms, the novel. Our discussions will move between crucial works of English literatures and influential theoretical texts as we explore the social conditions that led to the emergence of the novel. We will also discuss issues of class, gender, and imperial power in major works of Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, Johnson, Austen, Edgeworth, Heywood, and others. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4060 - Early Modern Women Writers


    3 cr. 3 hr Offered every fourth semester.

    This course examines Early Modern British women writer’s‚ works in relation to gender study, proto-feminism, society, literacy, creativity and female authorship and authority. Key issues covered include the evaluation of women’s writing in relation to canonicity, the integration of women’s voices into literary history, and consideration of the genres women writers used relative to their social roles.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.ENGL 1200 
  
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    ENGL 4080 - British Romanticism


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This course seeks to provide coverage of the “Big Six” British Romantic poets - Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats - while challenging the notion that these few poets define what we think of a “Romantic Poetry.” Through careful readings of women writers and less well-known male writers, the course explores a full range of historical, intellectual, and social events from 1789-1834. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4090 - The 19th-Century English Novel


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    Significant novels demonstrating the changing cultural milieu and varying approaches of the genre during this period are examined and discussed. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4100 - Victorian Literature


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This class focuses on the development of literature in the face of changes in science and industrialization in the 19th-century British Empire. Authors studied included Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Barrett-Browning, and those who comprise “The Golden Age” of British Children’s Literature. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4115 - British Modernism


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This course examines the major texts and trends of what is now called High Modernism. Authors studied include Ford Madox Ford, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf and T.S. Eliot. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4150 - The American Comic Tradition


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    The course will stress the development of what is a conspicuously American type of humor. The course begins with the quintessential American humorist and satirist, Mark Twain and then explores a range of comic genres and themes, from black comedy to feminist humor, that continue to enliven our national popular culture in many media. This course explores the writings and career of Mark Twain, and humorists who share the Twain legacy, including American film comedy and stand-up comics. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4200 - The Romantic Movement in U.S. Literature 1810–1860


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    This course begins by considering similarities between British and American Romanticism, then it explores the movement’s orientations towards nature, the supernatural, race, gender, and the individual’s role in society. Key authors for this course include Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Melville, Dickinson, and Whitman. While the focus will be on careful readings of selected texts, we occasionally consider how principles of Romanticism appear in the arts of painting, music, and dance. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4230 - American Novel Since World War II


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    The class provides a close analysis of seven or eight major novels. LIT

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4400 - Seminar


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every semester.

    The seminar examines topics for literary analysis and research as selected by the instructor. The seminar is required for English majors taking the literature track. Junior/Senior standing required. Others are admitted by permission of instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.ENGL 1200 
  
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    ENGL 4500 - Literary Theory


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    Theories about literature are examined, and their practical application in the classroom and in one’s own reading is discussed. Approaches to different forms of literature as well as a survey of changing historical perspectives are also explored.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructorr.
  
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    ENGL 4600 - Literary Cult of the Virgin Queen


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every fourth semester.

    Representations of England’s controversial “Virgin Queen” (1558-1603) were central to the nation‚s literary, artistic, and cultural life. This course examines key texts about Elizabeth I by contemporary writers and courtiers like Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, Walter Ralegh and William Shakespeare, as well as literature by lesser-known male and female writers of the 16th and 17th centuries.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1200  and satisfactory completion of one 3 cr. literature course at the 2000 or 3000 level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 4700 - Teaching Reading and Writing Across the Content Area


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the spring. Also offered evenings.

    This course provides practice and research in alternatives for teaching reading and writing in middle and secondary schools. Different approaches are explored and opportunities to test these approaches are available in pre-practicum experiences. A 25-hour pre-practicum is required.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2860 , or HIST 2860 , or MATH 2860 . GPA of 2.5 .
  
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    ENGL 4850 - Special Methods in English


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall. Also offered evenings.

    The approach in this course for the Initial Licensure Track provides a holistic framework for teaching secondary English emphasizing the interrelatedness of all language abilities: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. We experiment with and evaluate a variety of teaching strategies for creating responsive, reflective, and responsible readers, writers, and speakers as well as methods for the assessment of student performance. A prepracticum is required.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 2860  and ENGL 4700  or equivalent and a 2.75 overall GPA and 3.0 in biology, Communication/Literacy MTEL and Subject Area Exam.
  
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    ENGL 4860 - English Practicum in a Secondary School II


    4.5 cr. Offered every spring semester.

    In the student teaching practicum students are assigned to cooperating schools for a semester of student teaching.

  
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    ENGL 4870 - English Practicum in a Secondary School II


    4.5 cr. Offered every spring semester.

    In the student teaching practicum students are assigned to cooperating schools for a semester of student teaching.

  
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    ENGL 4903 - Independent Study


    3 cr. Day course offered every semester.

    The Independent Study is for English Studies majors excelling in scholarship and can be taken upon approval of both department chair and advising instructor. Course of study, meetings, and credit are arranged with advisor.

  
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    ENGL 4940 - Internship


    3 cr. Day course offered every Semester.

    The Internship provides an opportunity to gain valuable on-the-job experience for university credit by working in business or industry. Students select field placement where they can use their abilities as communicators, learn new skills, and sample a potential job market. The Internship is a recommended component of the English Department Writing Track. Department approval and junior/senior standing required.

  
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    ENGL 4950 - Internship


    6 cr. Day course offered every Semester.

    The Internship provides an opportunity to gain valuable on-the-job experience for university credit by working in business or industry. Students select field placement where they can use their abilities as communicators, learn new skills, and sample a potential job market. The Internship is a recommended component of the English Department Writing Track. Department approval and junior/senior standing required.

  
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    ENGL 4960 - Internship


    9 cr. Day course offered every Semester.

    The Internship provides an opportunity to gain valuable on-the-job experience for university credit by working in business or industry. Students select field placement where they can use their abilities as communicators, learn new skills, and sample a potential job market. The Internship is a recommended component of the English Studies Department Professional Writing Concentration, although all majors are encouraged to pursue this option. Department approval and junior/senior standing required.

  
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    ENGL 4970 - Internship


    12 cr. Day course offered every Semester.

    The Internship provides an opportunity to gain valuable on-the-job experience for university credit by working in business or industry. Students select field placement where they can use their abilities as communicators, learn new skills, and sample a potential job market. The Internship is a recommended component of the English Department Writing Track. Department approval and junior/senior standing required.

  
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    ENGL 4975 - Directed Study


    1-6 cr.

    Directed study allows a student to carry out a non-research project or participate in an activity under the direct supervision of a faculty member. See the catalog description of Program Alternatives in The Curriculum  section for more details.

  
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    ENGL 4999 - English Capstone


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course is the culminating learning experience for all English majors, in the four different but equal tracks; namely, literature, education, professional writing, and theater. Students taking this course will engage with questions such as: what does it mean to be an English Major? What do theater, secondary, education, literature, and professional writing students have in common as they look ahead to their professional lives post graduation? In this capstone course, through various classroom activities and requirements that include a senior portfolio, students will explore their intellectual commonalities and probe the significance of what it means to be a student of the liberal arts.

    Prerequisite(s): 30 credit hours completed within the major.

Environmental Science

  
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    ENSC 1000 - Introduction to Environmental Science


    3 cr. 4 hr. Day course offered in the Fall. Also offered evenings.

    The goal of Introduction to Environmental Science is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. LAB, SMT

  
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    ENSC 2000 - Field Techniques in Environmental Science I


    3 cr. 4 hr. This course may be offered less than once every two years.

    This course will provide an introduction to the mode of thinking as well as the scientific techniques to performing data gathering appropriate for work in the field. As such it is appropriate for both environmental science and biology students. The focus of the field techniques will be ecological/biological. This course is independent of ENSC 2100 - Field Techniques in Environmental Science II .

  
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    ENSC 2100 - Field Techniques in Environmental Science II


    3 cr. 4 hr. This course may be offered less than once every two years.

    This course will provide an introduction to the mode of thinking as well as the scientific techniques to performing data gathering appropriate for work in the field. As such it is appropriate for both environmental science and biology students. The focus of the field techniques will be physical/biological. This course is independent of ENSC 2000 - Field Techniques in Environmental Science I .

  
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    ENSC 3000 - Elements of Physical Chemistry


    4 cr. 6 hr. This course may be offered less than once every two years.

    This is an introductory course in physical chemistry covering: thermodynamics, mass-transport, solutions, and other topics. It is designed to provide students with the ability to think critically and utilize physical parameters in chemical systems, to perform numerical calculations involving these systems and to use this understanding when viewing environmental problems and risks.

 

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