Feb 09, 2023  
Fitchburg State University 2021-2022 Graduate Catalog 
    
Fitchburg State University 2021-2022 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Other Courses

  
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    EDUC 7044H - Theory and Practice of Acquiring a Second Language


    3 cr. Elective
    This course provides participants with an introduction to the field of second language acquisition (SLA) at different age and proficiency levels with a focus on factors and instructional approaches that directly impact the second language classroom. We will examine the World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) Proficiency Descriptors as a starting point for setting goals for English learners (Els) based on proficiency levels in listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
    This course will explore the structural aspects of language learning as well as the profound influence of culture, socioeconomic background, and psycho-social factors on the acquisition process - and ultimately on academic learning. This course will provide information and insights into how to differentiate instruction based on these complex factors using a range of collaborative, self-reflective, and authentic activities in relationship to the principles of second language learning.

  
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    EDUC 7055H - Theory and Practice in Fostering Literacy in a New Language


    3 cr.
    This course provides participants with an introduction to pedagogical approaches to reading and writing instruction for English Language Learners (Ells); an overview of best practices to enhance literacy development within content area curriculum; an in-depth examination of the learning needs of students for whom English is a second language at different stages of proficiency (including those with limited or interrupted formal schooling); and a survey of authentic and effective methods of assessing growth in Ells’ reading and writing.

  
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    EDUC 7056H - Reflective Practicum Seminar


    3 cr.
    This course is designed to enrich the experience for candidates in their practicum and as a means for practicum candidates to hone their teaching competencies. Through this course, candidates will enhance their ability to become reflective practitioners by participating in collaborative, critical inquiry within their specific licensure area. They will refine their ability to develop and implement effective lesson plans, and engage in analyzing and reflecting on classroom situations, the teaching- learning process and on student engagement and classroom climate. Opportunities will be provided to share observations, questions, and reflections. Candidates will be guided in their selection of substantial evidence to support the CANDIDATE ASSESSMENT OF PERFORMANCE (CAP). They will complete focused tasks using data driven decision-making using formative and summative assessments and on the use of strategies to support diverse student learning, and will implement and assess the impact on student learning using these strategies.

  
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    EDUC 7064H - Academic Language


    3 cr.
    This course is designed to facilitate teacher understanding of how academic language Impacts learning. It will cover academic language features at the three levels of academic language as described in WIDA (word/phrase level, sentence level, and discourse level), both in terms of general academic register as well as specific to core content areas, in listening, speaking reading and writing.

  
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    EDUC 7073H - Theory and Practice in Sheltering Instruction


    3 cr.
    This course provides participants with an Introduction to the linguistic, sociocultural, academic and cognitive needs of English Language Learners (Ells) In the K-12 content classroom; an In-depth examination of the implications and challenges of simultaneously learning content and language; an overview of the eight components of sheltered content instruction as delineated in the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP®) Model, Including rationale, approach, and application to specific content areas; an analysis of considerations for Ells and their families In the wider contexts of school, home and community; and an inventory of best practices for sheltered content instruction, including curriculum development, task design, instructional techniques, and ideas for collaboration.

  
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    EDUC 7179B - Using Educational Technology Effectively in 21st Century Schools


    3 cr. Elective
    This course is designed to provide participants the opportunity to rethink teaching and learning through building and strengthening essential 21st century technology skills. Through participation in this course, educators will have the opportunity to become well versed in current techniques, issues, and best practices in the field of educational technology. Participants will examine national and state standards in the area of educational technology while framing a personal technology portfolio. Engaging with a variety of learning activities and course materials, participants will develop important skills for using current technology tools as teaching and learning tools. Participants will make connections between standards and classroom practice as they create projects and lessons that promote technology infused school environments.

     

  
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    EDUC 8045H - SEI Endorsement Course for Career and Vocational Educators


    3 cr.
    The purpose of this course is to prepare the Commonwealth’s teachers with the knowledge and skills to effectively shelter their content instruction so that our growing population of English learners (Els) can access curriculum, achieve academic success, and contribute their multilingual and multicultural resources as participants and future leaders in the 21st century global economy.

  
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    EDUC 8082E - New Teachers Collaborative: Principles of Progressive Education


    3 cr.
    In the Progressive Education Seminar; teacher participants work with colleagues to explore foundational texts and ideas associated with progressive education and to reflect on and apply these theories to their own practice. This seminar is organized in three sections, each exploring a series of Essential Questions and focusing on one or more of the Ten Common Principles of the Coalition of Essential Schools. The first section explores the Purpose and History of Progressive Education, expanding teachers’ understanding of the first common principle, “Learning to use one’s mind well,” Participants will explore ideologies and pedagogies that underlie progressive education and see how these Ideas have developed over time. Through the discussion of seminal texts, reflective journals, peer observations and synthesis paper, teacher participants will examine how Theodore R. Sizer, the Coalition of Essential Schools, and Parker are placed within a larger educational context. The second section, titled Adolescent Learning, allows teachers to examine common principle number four, “Personalization,” In this section, teachers will work together to learn about adolescent development and consider how students think, feel, and act in relation to their development. They will think specifically about “risk-taking” in and outside the classroom. Through continued use of reflective journaling and observations, as well as the interpretation of student ethnographic data, teachers will continue to synthesize their learning through writing as they examine how students learn and how this impacts our thinking and understanding as educators. The final section of this course shifts towards the work of educators, examining the design of the Progressive Constructivist Classroom. Teacher participants will examine their role in designing student-centered, inquiry-based lessons and broaden their understanding of the second and fifth common principles, “Less is more” and “Student-as-worker, teacher-as-coach.” Participants will learn the “what” and “how” of constructivism by engaging in hands-on and authentic learning themselves. They will also become familiar with contemporary research on foundational Ideas that support these instructional beliefs.

     

  
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    EDUC 8190E - New Teachers Collaborative - 2 Year Practicum and Capstone Portfolio


    3 cr.
    The semester-long internship experience, through New Teachers Collaborative, an MA ESE-approved apprenticeship model of teacher preparation program, supports teachers in reflective practice during their second year of teaching in the New Teachers Collaborative, Candidates engage in a robust 680-hour practicum, where they serve as full-time teachers In the classroom and engage in all tasks and activities associated with classroom practice, through which they also: 1) plan for Instruction; 2) assess student work; 3) act as advisors to small groups of students; 4) engage In student-led goal-setting conferences with students and their families; 5) participate in grade-level, content, and all-school faculty meetings; 6) assume responsibilities outside the classroom, Including extra-curricular activities; 7) observe and learn from other teachers In their practice, and; 8) meet regularly with NTC program director to deepen their reflective practice, as well as ask for, and receive real-time feedback on their work and progress. The New Teachers Collaborative Year Two practicum is fully aligned with MA ESE Guidelines for Professional Standards for Teachers.

     

  
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    MTED 7042B - Strategic Teaching in Early Childhood and Elementary Math


    3 cr. Elective
    This course is designed to strengthen elementary teacher’s mathematics content knowledge and provide participants with the opportunity to strategically plan their instruction using strategies related to best practices, direct Instruction, cooperative learning, spiraling approaches, and assessment. Through participation in this course, participants will have the opportunity to delve into K-6 mathematics content and standards. Students will then explore current research on instructional practices and best practices for mathematics, and plan strategically toward mathematical instruction.

     


Applied Communication

  
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    COMM 7003 - Social Media Theory


    3 cr.
    Social media are powerful forces in the modern world, with much good linked to their implementation and integration into the social fabric. Nevertheless, technological development is not an unqualified blessing: technologies may have negative effects for some people, at some times, in some circumstances. Some negative consequences are unanticipated, some are predictable, and some are intentional features of the design or implementation. But because social media technologies are rightly seen as indispensable for solving problems and improving the quality of life, societies invest in the design and development of technologies, hoping to shape and direct it. This class will explore the relationship between technology and society to understand where technologies come from, how they are used within social media, and how they may be shaped to create better futures in society and industry. We will develop skills for critical analysis and argument development.

  
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    COMM 7005 - Communication Ethics


    3 cr.
    This course examines some of the large issues that face the communications field and considers how the law and one’s ethical standards may address these issues. Rather than a review of the law, the course encourages students to think about how the law requires action or inaction and why. Various models for ethical and legal decision making are examined as well.

  
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    COMM 7006 - New and Emerging Media


    3 cr
    As an ongoing response to the rapidly advancing field of Communications Media, New and Emerging Media integrates the study, production, and practice of using emergent media that is changing our increasingly immersive media environment and necessitates a new lens for our shifting cultural landscape. Taking a hands-on approach, students explore and discover pioneering media en route to conceptualizing, producing and then using innovative prototypes of their own. This progressive course utilizes a variety of methods, including seminar discussion, reading and applying communication theory, kinesthetic use of devices, research and analysis of new and emerging kinds of media, the use of novel communication technologies, and the development of a capstone project.

  
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    COMM 7007 - Social Mobilities


    3 cr.
    This seminar is an exploration of what it means to live with personal, portable, and handheld media technologies. We will study these technologies across time and space by situating them within their historical contexts and by studying their use in various settings. We’ll also employ a variety of theoretical frameworks and interdisciplinary approaches. Simultaneously, we will attempt to analyze and theorize our own handheld media experiences through and against the course readings.

  
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    COMM 7008 - Visual Communication and Design


    3 cr.
    The course explores the practice, philosophies, theories, and research surrounding visual communication. Students become familiar with the key works and prominent ideas, examine enduring questions from the field as raised by philosophical inquiry, use visual literacy principles as a framework for media study, and analyze media using the language of the field.

  
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    COMM 7011 - Foundation of Communication Studies


    3 cr.
    In this course, students examine origins, nature, and consequences of communication in a variety of subfields. This course reviews the roles of theory in comprehension of communication practices. Furthermore, it introduces the link between communication theory and the methodologies of communication research, including both qualitative and quantitative approaches, with an emphasis on interpretive approaches that are relevant to organizational settings.

  
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    COMM 7018 - Social Media Theory


    3 cr.
    This class will explore the relationship between technology and society through social media, and how theory shapes these important areas. This will also explore where technologies emerge from, how they are used within social media, and how they may be shaped to create better futures in society and industry. It is not a class where memorization is the primary goal. Instead, it teaches critical analysis and thinking of social media, culture, and society as areas for critical argument and development.
     

  
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    COMM 7300 - Health Communication


    3 cr.
    The course presents an overview of health communication theory and research addressing issues in interpersonal, small group, organizational, public relations, and use of mass media in the health care setting. Students will learn how communication professionals work within a health care setting to help the organization meets its mission of patient care.

  
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    COMM 7301 - Gender Communication


    3 cr.
    The course introduces the principal concepts of gender-based communication. The student will explore the roles that communication plays in presentation and understanding gender roles and gender identities. Through this exploration the student will increase their awareness and understanding of interaction between genders in a variety of context as well as develop an analytic attitude toward gender and communication in everyday life.

  
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    COMM 8009 - Intercultural Communication Competence


    3 cr.
    This course introduces students to the core concepts, theories and research on intercultural communication competence. Students will explore a broad range of communication practices and dynamics that emerge in the process of interaction between individuals and groups from diverse cultural backgrounds in a variety of contexts, in both, face-to-face and computer-mediated forms of communication. Emphasis is placed on developing conceptual understanding and skills needed for increasing intercultural communication competence.

  
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    COMM 8011 - Interpersonal Communication


    3 cr.
    This course explores interpersonal communication theory and will provide the student with the tools to understand and think about the communication process, methods to research interpersonal communication and skills to call upon in situated human interaction. Students work through a range of theoretical, methodological, descriptive and interpretive critical readings to reach these goals.

  
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    COMM 8012 - Intercultural Communication


    3 cr.
    This course examines intercultural communication through communication theory which differs from other social science disciplines. The course will equip the students with tools to understand and think about intercultural communication methods to call upon in future intercultural contacts. This course will show that people experience different ways of being human because of the communication they use.

  
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    COMM 8013 - Applied Rhetoric


    3 cr.
    This course takes place at the intersection of rhetorical theory and rhetoric in actual practice. At the convergence of theory and practice, the student will learn the methodology of rhetorical analysis through discussions, instruction and examples. Students will examine the communication practices, artifacts and environments that to a large extent comprise our lived experience.

  
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    COMM 8021 - Integrated Social Media


    3 cr.
    This course offers students the opportunity to learn about advanced applications of social media and produce high quality content for organizations. Issues such as search engine optimization, workflow, convergence, production of culture, conscientious posting, and coordination between networked audiences and publics will be addressed, This course examines communication theory and practices, how they are integrated and illustrated. in social media, and how it affects users and producers. Modern social media are ever-evolving toolsets and distribution platforms, and they are linked by a core set of skills and best practices, This course applies those core skills and practices to user organizations as they relate to business and communicative contexts.

  
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    COMM 8112 - Health Communication and Social Change


    3 cr.
    Applied communication scholars have contributed substantially to the study of communication practices of groups, organizations and communities working towards social change, including studies of public health campaigns and activism. Given the current changes in the social, political, and economic contexts in which health care is delivered, public health practitioners must learn to develop effective campaigns to promote change in attitudes and/or behaviors, to improve social and economic conditions, to advance social policies, and to secure necessary resources. This course will explore the theories and methods that inform various social change strategies, activist projects and campaigns, along with specific examples of communication strategies used in planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health campaigns and initiatives.

  
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    COMM 8114 - Social Media Marketing


    3 cr.
    This course offers students the opportunity to learn about integrating marketing concepts and campaigns with newer outputs such as social media, and producing high quality content for organizations or personal sites overseen by graduate students. Marketing is a concept focused on reaching out to potentially engaged publics, with a goal of galvanizing audiences around a brand. Issues such as search engine optimization, workflow, convergence, production of culture, conscientious posting, and coordination between networked audiences and publics will be addressed. This course examines communication theory and practices, how they are integrated and illustrated in social media, and how this integration affects users and producers. We will apply those core skills and practices to user organizations as they relate to business and communicative contexts. 

  
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    COMM 8115 - Communication and Social Change


    3 cr.
    This course will explore the theories and methods that inform various social change strategies, activist projects and campaigns, along with specific examples of communication strategies used in planning, implementation, and evaluation of public health campaigns and initiatives. Students will study various communication strategies to identify the most persuasive strategies used to promote social change.

  
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    COMM 8120 - Crisis Communication


    3 cr.
    This course in Crisis Communication emphasizes a proactive approach to planning for, managing and then responding to organizational crises by following a comprehensive crisis management process. It is intended for students in both the Applied Communication and Health Communication Programs insofar as it will emphasize the application of conceptual and substantive readings to the actual practice of crisis communication. Beginning from the assumption that all organizations should be prepared for crises, we will use a series of case studies in crisis management in conjunction with Ongoing Crisis Communication: an in depth analysis of a past organizational crisis and the communication strategies and practices that were employed in response; and your development of a Comprehensive Crisis Management Plan (CCMP) for an actual organization in your field to cultivate your own expertise in how to forecast and then develop a successful communications approach for any exigent crisis.

  
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    COMM 8500 - Philosophical and Rhetorical Issues in Professional Writing


    3 cr.
    This course examines critical philosophical issues inherent in technical and professional writing. Adopting a historical approach, the application of various philosophical stances to the roles of jargon, syllogism, enthymeme, objectivity/subjectivity, logical proof, deconstruction and error will be examined.

  
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    COMM 9000 - Topics


    3 cr.
    Course content varies from semester to semester, reflecting contemporary issues in the discipline and depending upon student and faculty interest.

  
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    COMM 9010 - Contemporary Issues in Communication


    3 cr.
    This course assesses new technologies and potential applications within communications media and prepares students for long-range planning. Students examine the merging of machine and human intelligences within this century. The course examines the future of such developments with regard to new media technologies, interpersonal communication, and intrapersonal communication, the sense of self, and what it means to be human in the 21st century and beyond.

  
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    COMM 9022 - Quantitative Research Methods


    3 cr.
    In this course, students develop a working knowledge of the research methods and basic statistical skills needed to collect, analyze, and visualize quantitative data.  Core concepts covered include reliability and validity. Further, this course reviews the social and ethical issues related to designing projects and collecting data for applied research in the social sciences. No prior statistical experience is required.

  
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    COMM 9023 - Qualitative Research Methods


    3 cr.
    This course introduces students to the theory, ethics and practice of qualitative research methods. Students will gain hands-on experience with qualitative data collection, analysis, coding and interpretation, strategies for validating the accuracy of research findings, writing qualitative narrative and developing critical assessment of the epistemological and ethical implications of research with human subjects. Covered research methods will include interviews, focus groups, and participatory visual methodologies.

  
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    COMM 9025 - Data and Analytics


    Through the lens of communication and the social sciences, this class explores the ways that individuals, businesses, governments, and non-profit organizations increasingly use data to form arguments about society, make decisions, and generate profits. This class will introduce basic foundational skills in working with data and then quickly scale up to concepts such as data analysis, visualization, and machine learning. Through hands-on projects with data you will work to understand its function and limits — both the benefits and risks.

  
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    COMM 9072 - Persuasion in Context: Communications for Marketing, Advertising, and Public Relations


    3 cr.
    This course exposes students to the theories, strategies and techniques of designing managed communications campaigns for marketing, advertising, and public relations professions. Students will explore relevant communication theories of persuasion and past practices in professional persuasion contexts. Based on their developing understanding, students will form small entrepreneurial design teams to create and evaluate campaigns for clients of their choosing. Final designs will be presented formally in appropriate written and oral forms.

  
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    COMM 9110 - Communication Research Methods


    3 cr.
    Student examine the various research tools and methodologies used in the communications field to produce a viable thesis proposal. Students are familiarized with methods of content analysis, audience research, needs assessment, and the use of statistical procedures to quantify value and variable measurement. The value of research conducted by others is recognized as a tool in conducting one’s own research.

  
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    COMM 9120 - Legal and Ethical Issues in Communication


    3 cr.
    This course examines some of the large issues that face the communications field and considers how the law and one’s ethical standards may address these issues. Rather than a review of the law, the course encourages students to think about how the law requires action or inaction and why. Various models for ethical and legal decision making are examined as well.

  
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    COMM 9130 - Organizational Communication


    3 cr.
    This course provides a perspective on the internal politics, legal regulations and organizational strategies for communication within an organization. Issues such as corporate culture, change, cultural diversity and leadership are addressed. This course analyzes communication theory and how it affects behavior of the members of an organization. Communication is an essential aspect of organizational functioning and the majority of managerial problems are rooted in communication. This course examines the major theoretical and practical aspects of communication in organizations as they apply to business and governmental contexts.

  
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    COMM 9200 - Practicum in Communication


    6 cr.
    This course is a practical experience in which students apply knowledge and skills in a real-life problem-solving situation. Students receive first-hand experience in identifying the problem, setting the parameters, planning for the application of human and technological resources, and evaluating the outcome. A mediated oral presentation of the project is made to the sponsoring organization and to the graduate advisor.

    Prerequisite(s): COMM 9110  and permission of advisor.
  
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    COMM 9970 - Capstone


    3 cr.
    Capstone provides each student with the opportunity to synthesize and apply what they have learned in their earlier graduate coursework in an ambitious term-length project that unfolds within an online seminar environment. Students will conceive, propose, design, and then incrementally produce this Capstone Project within a real world context, which can be working with (or within) an organization, a community, or perhaps even a social movement. The key is that it be real, experiential, and applied. By adopting a process approach to the production of this Capstone Project, this online classroom community will serve as a workshop environment for receiving valuable guidance and regular feedback from other students and the instructor, thereby supporting the advancement of their work to a professional caliber. The Capstone Project, then, provides a culminating experience in which students constructively apply concepts, theories, and research skills gained in the Applied Communication program to real world professional practice.

  
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    COMM 9980 - Thesis in Communication


    6 cr.
    This is an empirical study of a proposition stating the relationship between two or more concepts, phenomena or events. This critical analysis focuses on a current or potential problem or practice facing managers of business, industry, government, and health service media centers. The study includes a research procedure for the tabulation, statistical analysis and interpretation of numerical data.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of advisor and COMM 9110 .

Art

  
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    ART 7013 - Book Making as Art and Craft


    3 cr.
    This course is an intensive study of bookmaking as an art form and communication tool throughout history. Students will create books through different processes and of different styles.

    Prerequisite(s): Art background or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 7016 - The Mask and the Maker


    3 cr.
    Students will explore different techniques of making masks. They will examine the role of the mask maker and meanings of masks as an historical, multicultural and personal journey in becoming mask makers.

  
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    ART 7021 - Introduction to Encaustic Art - Contemporary Practice


    3 credits
    Summer 2020

    Encaustic is a versatile artistic medium with a fascinating history.  A blend of beeswax, resin and pigment, it was developed by the ancient Greeks to waterproof and then embellish sailing vessels. Encaustic was later used by the Romans to adorn ceramics and sculpture, and adopted by Egyptians to paint funerary portraits entombed along the Nile River basin in the 1st century BCE. This course will examine encaustic’s venerable traditions, its rediscovery by modern practitioners, and the medium’s recent revitalization among contemporary artists.  Studio projects will investigate a variety of methods for working with molten wax and explore many of its most compelling properties — luminosity, translucency malleability and adhesion.  Sculpture, photography, printmaking, painting and drawing techniques will be employed to create works that combine multiple practices.  

  
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    ART 7026 - Printmaking


    3 credits
    This studio art course explores printmaking as a contemporary art form. A range of printmaking techniques are introduced, including chine colle’, monotype, non-acid intaglio, and relief printing, as well as several experimental techniques using common materials. The emphasis will be on using printmaking media to create original artworks, taking advantage of the qualities that can be achieved through various forms of printmaking. Students will learn to create print editions-sets of matching, multiple prints-and also will experiment with unique print techniques such as monoprint and monotype. The course will explore the history and theory behind the different techniques, with a particular focus on how contemporary approaches can stimulate original artistic ideas.

  
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    ART 8002 - Projects in Eco-Art Materials


    3 credits
    This studio art course emphasizes the development of personal artistic projects that respond to contemporary issues using art materials that are safer and less environmentally damaging than some traditional paints.  Students will learn to handle the medium of water-based oil paint as the primary medium, and explore its painterly properties, while gaining exposure to other alternative artistic materials as well. Studio work will include projects that range from traditional subjects, such as landscape and still life, to work that touches on social justice issues and responds thematically to environmental concerns, in keeping with the materials introduced in the course.

  
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    ART 8100 - Mixed-Media Encaustic Art


    3 cr.
    This course extends basic applications of encaustic art into mixed-media collage and assemblage, and students will work with a variety of media including paper, metal, wood and fiber. Sculpture, photography, printmaking, painting and drawing techniques will be employed to create works that combine multiple practices.  Participants will be encouraged to continue to develop a personal artistic voice through  the exploration of materials, techniques and composition.   The medium of encaustic paint combines the luminescence of watercolor, the quick drying properties of acrylic with the richness of oils.  
     

    Prerequisite(s): ART 7021   
  
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    ART 8146 - Technology in the Art Studio


    3 credits
    This course explores the relationship between traditional hands-on studio techniques and digital art technologies. It is a lab experience that provides professional development in technologies that can be used in one’s own creative process, and also in how they can be applied to teaching practices in an art classroom.  Topics may include use of digital photography and editing software, graphics and illustration, interactive and time-based applications, and tools for visual presentations. Emphasis is placed on integrating appropriate tools into one’s own artistic practice, and applying them to varied classroom situations. No prior technology expertise is required.

  
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    ART 8150 - Advanced Graduate Studio


    3 cr.
    This advanced studio course emphasizes the student’s personal connection with the process of art making. Students design a specific studio project in their own chosen medium(s), so as to expand upon their prior artistic experience and further develop their artistic ability and vision by creating a body of related artwork.

    Prerequisite(s): Art degree or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 8500 - Art and Human Development


    3 cr.
    This course examines the production, history, criticism and philosophy of art. Students experience slide lectures as well as a museum trip during which noted works of art are examined from a formal, contextual and philosophical point of view involved in their creation. Students create art works applying this information.

    Prerequisite(s): Art degree or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ART 9090 - Art Presentation


    3 cr.
    A student creates a culminating project in art under the supervision/direction of an art faculty member or the program chairperson. A student planning an exhibit of his/her works should have the majority of them created for this exhibit.

    Prerequisite(s): Must successfully complete at least 18 hours in the program.

Biology

  
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    BIOL 7001 - Biology of Mammals


    3 cr.
    This course is an investigation of the evolution and present biology of mammals involving extensive use of native New England species. Laboratory work includes identification of mammal species from skins, skulls, and tracks. Field trips enhance familiarity with what is learned in the classroom.

    The course involves four hours of lecture/laboratory plus additional hours for field trips.
  
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    BIOL 7003 - Freshwater Biology


    3 cr.
    This is a field study course designed to study aquatic ecological systems. Daily field trips are taken to the lakes, ponds, streams, and rivers in the Fitchburg area to collect water samples and specimens. Laboratory analysis is conducted to determine the physical and chemical properties of the water and to identify and study the organisms.

  
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    BIOL 7005 - Biology of the Brain and Behavior


    3 cr.
    This course focuses on the biological bases of behavior. A variety of media, including lectures, journal articles and films, are used to study ethology, psychology, neurobiology and genetics in an attempt to understand the mechanisms underlying behavior.

    Prerequisite(s): One semester of any of the following: General Biology, General Psychology, Anatomy and Physiology or instructor’s permission.
  
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    BIOL 7006 - Medical Parasitology


    3 cr.
    The course examines the biology of medically important animal parasites. Lectures emphasize clinical considerations, such as life cycles, modes of transmission, epidemiology, symptomology and treatment. Additionally, methods of collection and identification are explored.

  
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    BIOL 7007 - Ecology


    3 cr.
    The dynamic relationship between organisms and their environment is investigated in this survey of major ecological concepts and methodology. Field and laboratory work emphasize problem identification, formulation of hypothesis, data collection, and analysis and interpretation of results in terms of biological implications.

  
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    BIOL 7008 - Winter Botany


    3 cr.
    A comprehensive study of plants in winter designed to discover plant adaptations for survival during the cold season. Field trips are taken to observe and identify trees and herbaceous plants in winter conditions.

    Lectures and indoor labs are included.
  
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    BIOL 7009 - Model Systems and Techniques in Embryology


    3 cr.
    This is an intensive laboratory course emphasizing embryological and developmental biological techniques. Current theories regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying early development and classical developmental processes will be the major themes. Topics may include regeneration, metamorphosis, aging, organogenesis and pattern formation. Lecture is combined with the laboratory study of the development of live sea urchins, amphibians and planaria, as well as work with prepared slides.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1200, 1300, 1400, 1600 or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIOL 7010 - Techniques in Neurohistology


    3 cr.
    This course introduces basic neurobiology as well as the current techniques in neurohistology. The students will work with neural tissue provided by the University of Massachusetts Medical School. This material will be fixed, imbedded in paraffin, cut, stained, and mounted. The student will prepare a complete personal set of slides. The techniques require patience and discipline, and provides the student with a unique experience regarding the structure of the brain.

  
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    BIOL 7012 - The Modern Secondary School


    3 cr.
    This class is required of all MAT candidates who do not have initial licensure to teach and covers a broad range of issues faced by teachers in today’s secondary schools. Students become familiar with the complexities and demands of secondary school teaching.

    This course includes 25 hours of prepracticum experience.
  
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    BIOL 7200 - Summer Field Botany


    3 cr.
    This course is a field study of trees, shrubs, ferns, and herbs found in New England.

    Daily field trips to collect plants for personal herbarium projects and daily laboratory work facilitate the study of ecology and taxonomy of plants.
  
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    BIOL 7300 - Evolution


    3 cr.
    This is an introduction of the principles governing the evolution of living organisms. Emphasis is placed on the cause and affect relationship of various biological disciplines on the evolutionary process. A survey of paleontological evidence demonstrates how evolutionary principles have influenced life.

    Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate course in botany or zoology, ecology, and genetics.
  
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    BIOL 7400 - Bioethics


    3 cr.
    The purpose of this course is to communicate the process of ethical reasoning in conjunction with biological science. Students gain an understanding of how cooperation between those concerned with the results of biological research and the makers of public policy must become a working hypothesis. Through an examination of the current literature, students uncover facts and general principles of bioethics and relate their near and long term consequences to moral positions.

  
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    BIOL 7600 - Marine Biology


    3 cr.
    This course examines physical, chemical, and biological factors in the marine environment. The dominant animals and plants in salt marsh, sand beach, tide pools, and a rocky inter-tidal area are investigated. Data on physical and chemical conditions is collected and correlated with the composition, behavior, and physiology of the flora and fauna within each habitat.

    Saturday or Sunday field trips supplement lectures.
  
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    BIOL 8000 - Advanced Methods of Teaching at the Secondary Level


    3 cr.
    This course combines academic study with clinical practice and supervision. Theories and topics studied and demonstrated include learning styles, critical thinking, computer applications and inclusive learning environments. Emphasis is placed on integrating culturally or linguistically diverse students and those with special needs. Interdisciplinary course development and implementation, student assessment including portfolio assessment and writing are studied for utilization across the curriculum.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 7012  or initial teacher licensure.
  
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    BIOL 8002 - Independent Study


    3 cr.
    The independent study provides an opportunity for biology students to work independently on the development of a written work, a science curriculum, a job related document or some other activity agreed upon by the student and the graduate faculty advisor. The final product of this study is a written or otherwise permanent documentation of the study completed.

  
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    BIOL 8005 - Practicum in Biology I


    3 cr.
    This practicum is part one of a two part, semester-long student teaching experience in the secondary setting.  Candidate practice will be assessed using key indicators of the Professional Standards for Teachers (PSTs) and the Candidate Performance of Assessment (CAP) rubric.

    Prerequisite(s): SEED 7015 , SPED 7709 , ENGL 8076 , SCED 9000 , EDUC 7096  , and successful completion of Stage 2 Review.
  
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    BIOL 8006 - Practicum in Biology II


    3 cr.


    This practicum is part two of a two part, semester-long student teaching experience in the secondary setting.  Candidate practice will be assessed using key indicators of the Professional Standards for Teachers (PSTs) and the Candidate Performance of Assessment (CAP) rubric.

    Prerequisite(s): SEED 7015 , SPED 7709 , ENGL 8076 , SCED 9000 , EDUC 7096 , and successful completion of Stage 2 Review.


     

  
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    BIOL 8090 - Practicum


    6 cr.
    Student teaching experience is offered to give practical classroom experience to those degree students who have not satisfied the state requirements for certification.

  
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    BIOL 8250 - Curriculum and Technology


    3 cr.
    This course looks at the integration of educational technology in the classroom and its relationship to learning theories and curriculum, specifically, the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. The course also explores the use of the Internet as a classroom resource to strengthen curriculum. Various Internet related topics are covered, such as acceptable use policies and copyright issues.

  
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    BIOL 8260 - Curriculum Design and Development


    3 cr.
    This course is designed to provide students with knowledge and skills of the curriculum development-revision process. The course examines societal demands on the curriculum and the role of the American school in a democratic and multicultural society as students assess, revise and implement instructional programs and the curriculum in a systematic and logical way. Active participation in school-based curriculum teams, IEP teams, site-based management teams and community groups teach effective delivery of services to all students and school improvement/reform efforts. In collaborative groups students review, revise and expand the curriculum and assessment procedures in order to integrate current research findings and education reform initiatives.

  
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    BIOL 9004 - Research in Biology


    3 cr.
    Students will carry out research in a specific field of Biology that involves an in-depth exploration of a well-defined problem. The student must develop a hypothesis based on the data collected for the possible solution to the problem; develop experimental techniques to test the hypothesis, and develop a logical conclusion also based upon the data collected. The final product is a written documentation of the research and results. Each study is done under the supervision of graduate faculty.

  
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    BIOL 9010 - Thesis in Biology


    3 cr.
    Students will conduct a research project that will result in a thesis. This thesis will be developed under the supervision of a thesis advisor and a thesis committee of at least three people.

  
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    BIOL 9011 - Seminar in Biology


    3 cr.
    This course is designed to introduce students to scientific research. Topics covered are hypothesis formation, experimental design, literature searches and quantitative methods. Emphasis is placed on student participation and evaluation of each topic. A final research proposal is required of each student.

  
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    BIOL 9012 - Action Research Internship


    3 cr.
    The Action Research Internship is a capstone experience allowing full integration and application of content knowledge and pedagogical theory and practice. A research project is completed during the duration of the internship, and the final product is a Biology Action Research Teacher Work Sample.

  
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    BIOL 9100 - Special Topics


    3 cr.
    Course content varies from semester to semester, reflecting contemporary issues in the discipline. It depends upon student and faculty interest.

  
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    BIOL 9400 - Clinical Experience


    6 cr.
    Clinical Experience is a capstone course allowing full integration and application of content knowledge and pedagogical theory and practice. In a high school classroom students incorporate all standards specific to the discipline of biology as well as all common standards for classroom teachers. A minimum of 400 clock hours or one full semester on-site under the auspices of the university is fulfilled. A research project is completed during the duration of the clinical experience.

  
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    BIOL 9500 - Internship


    6 cr.
    The internship is a capstone experience allowing full integration and application of content knowledge and pedagogical theory and practice. Within the individual’s classroom it incorporates all standards specific to the discipline of biology as well as all common standards for classroom teachers. A minimum of 400 clock hours or one full semester on-site under the auspices of the university is fulfilled. A research project is completed during the duration of the internship.

  
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    BIOL 9501 - Internship in Biology


    1-6 cr.
    The internship provides laboratory or field experience in conjunction with established biological programs at cooperating non-profit, governmental, industrial or private institutions. The institutional program directors and faculty from Fitchburg State University share supervision of the student. The nature of the final evaluation will be determined jointly by both the on and off campus supervisors.


Computer Science

  
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    CSC XXXX - Directed Study


    Directed study allows a student to carry out a non-research project or participate in an activity under the direct supervision of a faculty member. In exceptional circumstances, it can be used to offer an existing course to an individual student. All directed studies require approval of faculty sponsor, advisor, program chair and dean of graduate and continuing education.

    Prerequisite(s): At least 9 S.H. of graduate courses in Computer Science, and any course prerequisites for the course the directed study is used for.
  
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    CSC 7000 - Programming under UNIX in “C”


    3 cr.
    This course is offered infrequently

    This is an advanced level programming course exploring the C language, emphasizing I/O processing in the UNIX environment. Students will improve their C programming skills while exploring many of the resources made available by modern implementation of UNIX.

    Prerequisite(s): Pass the Placement Test or CSC 7131  
  
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    CSC 7011 - Computer Engineering


    4 cr.
    This class covers the conceptual and practical aspects of computer systems with emphasis on programmable hardware. Topics to be discussed are: electrical theory, electronic devices, digital logic, computer architecture and low-level microprocessor programming and interfacing.

  
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    CSC 7013 - Advanced Mathematics for Computer Scientists


    3 cr.
    This class covers mathematical foundations of computer science as well as mathematical applications in computer science. Modern analysis, linear algebra, mathematical logic, number theory and discrete mathematics will be discussed to highlight their importance for computer science.

  
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    CSC 7014 - The Practice of Computer Programming


    3 cr.
    This class covers some of the practical aspects of software engineering through a project based approach which builds confidence and competence in a variety of computer programming paradigms.

    Prerequisite(s): Pass the Placement Test or CSC 7131  
  
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    CSC 7015 - Introduction to Data Science


    3 cr.
    Human beings now generate, and collect, massive amounts of data. As big data becomes the norm in modern business and research, there is a growing demand for individuals who are able to make decisions and derive meaningful insight from large-scale, heterogeneous data.  A data scientist is a person who has the skills, knowledge, and ability to extract actionable knowledge from the raw data.  This course will cover the topics needed to solve data-science problems, which include data preparation (collection & Integration), data characterization and presentation, and data analysis (experimentation & observational studies).  Related courses are data mining, machine learning, and data visualization.

    Prerequisite(s): CSC 7013   and Pass the Placement Test or CSC 7131  
  
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    CSC 7050 - Theory of Computation


    3 cr.
    This course provides an introduction to theoretical computer science. The course covers the fundamentals of automata theory, formal languages and computability theory. Several distinct models of computation, including the Turing Machine, will be introduced. The concepts of computability, decidability and reducibility will be explored.

  
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    CSC 7131 - Advanced Programming


    3 cr. Elective
    This course covers the most essential concepts of modern Computer Programming with Python, Java and C programming languages. It starts with core computer science topics typically found in an undergraduate Computer Science curriculum, but at a graduate-level pace. Python programming language will be used as a tool for implementing advanced programming techniques and algorithms. Object Oriented Paradigm will be presented with Java. Finally, dynamic memory management, pointers and dynamic structures will be explored in C.

     

  
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    CSC 7132 - Operating Systems and Networking


    3 cr.
    This course covers the concepts, structure, and operation of modern operating systems and networking. Topics covered include: process management, scheduling, deadlock, memory management, virtual memory, networking, network security, and operating systems in network environments. A working knowledge of a higher-level system programming language and computer data structures is assumed.

    Prerequisite(s): Pass the Placement Test or CSC 7131  
  
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    CSC 7160 - Software Development in Computer Graphics


    3 cr.
    This course is offered infrequently

    This course is about developing in large-scale computer graphics package starting with low-level algorithms and using standard modularization and integration techniques practiced in industry. The course provides an in-depth introduction to state-of-the-art interactive computer graphics algorithms with special emphasis on the GKS standard. 2-D and 3-D viewing, clipping and geometric modeling will be studied. Raster extensions and mathematical algorithms will be presented.

    Prerequisite(s): Pass the Placement Test or CSC 7131  
  
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    CSC 7200 - Object Oriented Programming


    3 cr.
    This course introduces object oriented programming and object oriented design paradigms. Students are expected to have previous exposure to C and another object oriented programming. Topics covered include classes, polymorphism, encapsulation and inheritance, input/output streams, templates, exception handling, file processing and standard template library.

    Prerequisite(s): Pass the Placement Test or CSC 7131  
  
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    CSC 7255 - Data Communications and Networking


    3 cr.
    This course covers data communications principles, emerging networking technologies and local and wide area networks. Signal transmission analysis, modulation concepts, modems, multiplexers, digital technologies and various transmission models will be extensively discussed. Network protocols will be presented including TCP/IP protocol suite and IEEE 802 standards. Network technologies such as ISDN, xDSL, SONET, packet switching networks, Ethernet and ATM will also be discussed.

  
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    CSC 7300 - Cybersecurity Management


    3 credits
    This course covers technical and managerial aspects of cybersecurity. It focuses on how to proactively defend corporate systems from attacks and the technical aspects of countermeasures. Students will also learn what they need to know to manage these technologies. Students will also explore areas including cryptography, access control, firewalls, host hardening, and incident and disaster response. Prerequisite(s): CSC 7013  
  
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    CSC 7400 - Object Oriented Analysis and Design


    3 cr.
    This course introduces the software engineering principles used in the development of large software products. Topics such as requirements engineering using use cases, systems and software analysis using object-oriented principles, software design using class diagrams and implementation using CASE tools are covered. Project management issues are also introduced.

    Prerequisite(s): Pass the Placement Test or CSC 7131  
  
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    CSC 7500 - Database Design


    3 cr.
    This course covers concepts of database systems in general and relational database systems in particular. The techniques for database modeling and the concepts of Structured Query Language (SQL) will be studied. The issues involved in the design, implementation, maintenance and security of relational databases will be discussed.

  
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    CSC 7600 - Embedded Systems


    4 cr.
    This class covers some of the conceptual and practical aspects of microcontroller-based computer system development. Topics to be discussed are: microcontroller architecture, system specification, interrupt servicing, device driver design, serial I/O protocols and real-time data processing.

    Prerequisite(s): CSC 7011  
  
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    CSC 8007 - Parallel Programming with CUDA


    3 cr.
    This course covers programming techniques on the parallel computing architecture and programming model known as Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). The topics include the introduction of CUDA, the basic CUDA commands and syntax, as well as several optimizations for CUDA code and utilization of CUDA libraries. Students in the course will learn how to develop scalable parallel programs targeting the unique requirements for obtaining high performance on GPUs. 
     

    Prerequisite(s): Pass the Placement Test or CSC 7131  
  
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    CSC 8008 - Data Exploration, Analytics, and Visualization


    3 cr.
    This course covers fundamental paradigms and techniques of Data Exploration, Analytics, and Visualization.  The main Principles of software design for Data Visualization are introduced using R programming language.  Simulation programming will be covered in conjunction with important algorithms for Data Visualization.

    Prerequisite(s): Pass the Placement Test or CSC 7131  
  
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    CSC 8015 - Data Mining and Predictive Analytics


    3 cr.


    This course provides an overview of generative and discriminative classifiers for data mining applications.  Topics to be covered include decision trees, rule learners, regression models, Bayesian models, and support vector machines, as well as clustering methods such as k-means, kNN and EM.  Students will also be introduced to large-scale datasets and the need for data cleaning and data preparation issues, including noise models, dealing with missing and unbalanced data, discrete versus continuous features, and feature selection, including PCA and mutual information.  All methods will be implemented in standard statistical packages or extensions to languages like python.

    Prerequisite(s): CSC 7015  (may be taken concurrently)


     

  
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    CSC 8016 - Machine Learning for Data Science


    3 cr.
    This course provides an overview of the most useful statistical methods for data science applications.  Topics to be covered include linear regression, neural networks, and support vector machines.  These are paradigms used to find trends and anomalies, and classify data.  We will cover supervised and unsupervised learning, choosing and optimizing each technique.  Students will implement these methods and concentrate on using a wide variety of machine learning algorithms commonly utilized in data science and analytics.

    Prerequisite(s): CSC 7015  (may be taken concurrently)
  
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    CSC 8020 - Client/Server Networking


    3 cr.
    Client/server architecture is the standard used in most network applications today. The course is structured to dynamically cover the latest Internet technologies and latest terms and design methodologies used in client/server applications. A final project will include concepts from file systems, CPU scheduling, memory management, virtual memory, distributed computing, concurrency and security. Topics covered include client/server architecture, BSD and Windows socket programming, concurrency/deadlock, HTTP server overview, CGI/Servelets/SOAP, file system interface, Internet proxies, network management and utility classes.

 

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