Sep 18, 2021  
Fitchburg State University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
Fitchburg State University 2012-2013 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Science

  
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    CSC 4901 - Independent Study


    1 cr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    The independent study provides an opportunity for highly motivated students to explore advanced areas of computer science not provided within the departmental curriculum. Approval of the faculty sponsor, consent of the advisor and permission of the chairperson are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all the required 2000 level core courses with a Grade Point Average of 3.0 or more in those courses.
  
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    CSC 4902 - Independent Study


    2 cr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    The independent study provides an opportunity for highly motivated students to explore advanced areas of computer science not provided within the departmental curriculum. Approval of the faculty sponsor, consent of the advisor and permission of the chairperson are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all the required 2000 level core courses with a Grade Point Average of 3.0 or more in those courses.
  
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    CSC 4903 - Independent Study


    3 cr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    The independent study provides an opportunity for highly motivated students to explore advanced areas of computer science not provided within the departmental curriculum. Approval of the faculty sponsor, consent of the advisor and permission of the chairperson are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all the required 2000 level core courses with a Grade Point Average of 3.0 or more in those courses.
  
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    CSC 4940 - Internship


    3 cr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    A 3-credit on- or off-campus internship requires 12 hours of work each week for 15 weeks. Students apply their knowledge and skills to develop practical solutions to computer science or computer information systems problems. Approval by department chairperson is needed to register for this course. A written report on the work done in the format specified by departmental policy must be submitted to the chairperson to receive a grade.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all the required 2000 level core courses with a Grade Point Average of 3.0 or more in those courses.
  
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    CSC 4950 - Internship


    6 cr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    A 3-credit on- or off-campus internship requires 12 hours of work each week for 15 weeks. Students apply their knowledge and skills to develop practical solutions to computer science or computer information systems problems. Approval by department chairperson is needed to register for this course. A written report on the work done in the format specified by departmental policy must be submitted to the chairperson to receive a grade.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all the required 2000 level core courses with a Grade Point Average of 3.0 or more in those courses.
  
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    CSC 4975 - Directed Study


    1-6 cr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    A course in the departmental curriculum may be offered as directed study subject to the university policies and departmental policies. Approval of the faculty sponsor, consent of the advisor and permission of the chairperson are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all the required 2000 level core courses with a Grade Point Average of 3.0 or more in those courses.

Criminal Justice

  
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    CJ 2000 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course provides the student with an overview of the structure and organization of the criminal justice system. Emphasis is placed on the examination of the functions and decision processes of those agencies that deal with the management and control of crime and criminal offenders. The course includes didactic presentations, assigned readings, class discussions, visiting practitioner lecturers and small group discussions.

  
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    CJ 2012 - Police Administration


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every other year

    This course is a study of the organization, management, and administration of law enforcement agencies.  Topics include police administration in the political arena, organizational theory, police organizational structure, leadership, organizational communication, police subsystem tasks, decision-making, performance evaluation, and organizational improvement.  There will be an emphasis on how theory applies to the real world of policing and applying methods to the critical issues facing police managers.  This course will identify the skills required to supervise and manage law enforcement agencies.  The focus is on the roles of managers and supervisors as leaders, trainers, motivators, and problem solvers, the management and leadership skills necessary to head modern law enforcement agencies will also be discussed. 

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 Introduction to Criminal Justice, and CJ 2050 Principles and Practices of Law Enforcement
  
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    CJ 2016 - Private Security


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered every other year

    This course will provide an examination of the objectives of general and specific security programs and their implementation.  Consideration is given to administrative and physical aspects of security planning, loss prevention, and other areas of interest to the security field.  Students will study modern aspects of risk assessment/analysis and management.  The special problems of computer and digital security will be examined.  Crime prevention as it relates to the business and individual will be looked at focusing on special problems such as fraud and identity theft.  The issue of homeland security will be studied as it relates to security, loss prevention, and risk management.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 or permission of instructor.
  
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    CJ 2050 - Principles and Practices of Law Enforcement


    3 cr. 3 hrs Day course offered every Semester.

    Students will examine the nature, history, role, operations and management of law enforcement agencies. Additional topics to be explored include police powers, investigations, use and abuse of police force, police corruption, crime prevention and the future of policing.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 
  
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    CJ 2270 - Introduction to Legal Process


    3 cr. 3 hrs Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course serves as an introduction to the American legal system. Emphasis is placed on how courts and lawyers function, how cases are decided and the means by which courts interpret legislation. This course is cross-listed as POLS 2270 .

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 1000  or POLS 1100 .
  
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    CJ 2450 - Women in Criminal Justice


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year.

    This course will examine the involvement of females in the criminal justice system, as victims, offenders, workers and professionals. Female criminality will be explored from varied perspectives. Students will undertake a systematic examination of the issues, biases and problems affecting the girls and women involved in this system, with attention focused on the effects of these factors on them, their relationships and their families.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 
  
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    CJ 2500 - Correctional Law


    3 cr. 3 hrs. Day course offered every other year. Also offered evenings.

    Since the 1960s law has become an increasingly important accountability mechanism for corrections. Court decisions shaped the policies and practices in corrections institutions and, in some states, helped to transform prisons and jails into new organizational entities. This course seeks to help students understand how law affects the corrections environment, as well as examining current issues in corrections.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 
  
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    CJ 2550 - Criminal Law


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year. Also offered evenings.

    The focus of this course is the study of the general principles of criminal law. The approach adopted in this course involves the use of the text to explain general principles and their application to specific crimes followed by cases that apply the general principles to the facts of the specific cases. The students will be encouraged to formulate their own views regarding the application made by the court it its opinion on the one hand and, on the other, they will also be encouraged to understand the principles and definitions in order to apply them. Students will be required to act as legislators, judges, juries, defense attorneys and prosecutors in order to see the principles and definitions from all perspectives. I

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 .
  
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    CJ 2600 - Juvenile Justice


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year. Also offered evenings.

    The course is designed to develop student awareness of past and contemporary philosophies, practices and paradoxes of juvenile justice. The course examines the programmatic efforts designed for juveniles in trouble with the law and focuses on the relationships between the components of this system of justice. The content of the course may be supplemented by current journal research, lectures and panel discussions by practicing professionals, and/or a field-based class.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 .
  
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    CJ 2650 - Correctional Theory and Practice


    3 cr. 3 hrs. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    Corrections is the branch of the criminal justice system comprised of the programs, facilities and organizations responsible for the management of individuals who have been accused or convicted of criminal offenses. This course examines the history, operation, structure and clientele of modern correctional institutions and assesses the problems confronting them. The course also explores the relationships between corrections and social, political and economic trends within society.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 
  
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    CJ 2651 - Ethics in Criminal Justice


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course will acquaint the student with the theoretical foundations essential to ethical decision making by introducing students to ethical theory, major ethical belief systems and ethical issues in criminal justice. Students will develop awareness of and explore the major ethical issues/questions specific to each of the criminal justice subsystems; in addition, the student will become familiar with and examine the ethical challenges and dilemmas that confront criminal justice professionals across the U.S. system of justice. Strategies for responding to situations are considered and models of ethical decision making are examined.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 .
  
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    CJ 3000 - Domestic Terrorism and Hate Crime


    3 cr. 3 hrs Day course offered every other year. Also offered evenings.

    From the Ku Klux Klan to Timothy McVeigh, a few Americans have sought to achieve their ends through violent action. This course introduces students to the variety of extremist groups within the United States and examines their history, nature, extent and dangerousness. It also explores hate crime, a relatively new responsibility of the criminal justice system. We will look at the social construction of hate crime and issues concerning its enforcement. B

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 .
  
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    CJ 3053 - Victimology


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year.

    In this course, students will learn: the definition of victimology; of victimology’s historical perspective and the startup of the victims’ rights movement; of the different types of victimizations; about the two main methods of measuring crime in America; of the roles and responsibilities of the many principals within the criminal justice system as they relate to victims’ rights; and, learn about victim services and assistance in responding to criminal victimizations.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 .
  
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    CJ 3100 - Organized Crime and Youth Gangs


    3 cr. 3 hrs. Day course offered every other year. Also offered evenings.

    This course offers an overview of the nature and extent of organized crime, as well as the impact of organized crime on U.S. society, both in terms of economy and politics. The course also takes up contemporary youth gangs in the United States, concluding with policies and programs addressing gangs, including law enforcement and prevention and intervention efforts. B

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 
  
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    CJ 3130 - Criminal Justice Research Methods


    3 cr. 3 hrs. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course provides students with an understanding of how researchers use scientific methods to frame and explore issues important in criminal justice. The course focuses on methods of measuring crime, data collection, research design, sampling and probability, survey and questionnaire design, methods of observation and written communication of results. Q

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 
  
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    CJ 3135 - Advanced CJ Research Methods


    3 cr.

    This course follows CJ 3130 , Criminal Justice Research Methods, in a 2-course sequence that seek to provide students a set of skills related to conducting, interpreting, and evaluating research, both primary and secondary; effective communication; and scientific, critical, and analytic thinking. Required for majors.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 , MATH 1700 , and CJ 3130 .
  
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    CJ 3140 - Criminal Justice Data Analysis


    3 cr. 3 hrs. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course explores the ways in which researchers use data analysis in criminal justice research. The course focuses on methods of analyzing crime, using secondary data such as the Uniform Crime Reports, National Crime Victimization Surveys, NIBRS and other frequently-used datasets. The student is introduced to computer software packages, such as SPSS, to analyze data. Students will evaluate critically several studies, including their design, analysis of data and conclusions. Q

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000  and CJ 3130  and MATH 1700 .
  
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    CJ 3141 - Innovative Practices in Policing


    3 hr. 3 hr. Offered every other year

    In this course students will examine and analyze research in innovative practices in policing.  The emphasis will be on best practices backed up by research as well as those innovations that are promising and that have potential for improving the delivery of police service.  This course will explore strategic innovations including, but not limited to, Community Policing, Problem Oriented Policing, Evidence-Based Policing, Third Party Policing, Pulling Levers Policing, and Hot Spots Policing.  In addition, technology based innovations such as Compstat and Intelligence Led Policing will be explored.  The focus will be on the effectiveness of the policing strategies in question.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 Introduction to Criminal Justice, CJ 2050 Principles and Practice of Law Enforcement, and CJ 3130 Criminal Justice Research Methods.  CJ 3000 Police Administration is suggested.
  
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    CJ 3150 - Program Evaluation


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year.

    Perhaps the most important question for persons and institutions in the helping and public service professions is whether their efforts are accomplishing their goals. Program evaluation is the process of determining how well a program, treatment, or other intervention designed to help ameliorate social or personal problems, including but not limited to crime and delinquency, or otherwise enhance the quality of life and/or the overall well-being of society, has accomplished its goals. This process requires attention to the interests and desires of multiple segments of society who have a stake in the outcome of the intervention as well as to the principles of scientific methodology. In this course students will learn, among other things, the importance of evaluating not only how well an intervention worked but how well it was implemented in the first place, the value of using the results of evaluations to design new programs or improve existing ones, how to conduct a program evaluation, how to evaluate the validity of a program evaluation, and, perhaps most importantly, the role of program evaluation in designing good public policy.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 , PSY 1100 , MATH 1700 , CJ 3130 , SOC 3130 , HMSV 2050  or PSY 2000 .
  
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    CJ 3200 - White Collar and Corporate Crime


    3 cr. 3 hrs. Day course offered every other year. Also offered evenings.

    This course introduces students to a variety of topics and issues in the area of white-collar and corporate crime. It examines and contrasts the treatment corporate and white-collar offending by the criminal justice and regulatory justice systems. It looks at definitional issues, the nature and extent of white-collar crimes, crime types, case studies and the etiology of offending. B

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 .
  
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    CJ 3242 - Psychology of Crime


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course complements SOC 2750 - Criminology . While Criminology focuses on the social context of crime and criminals, Psychology of Crime takes the biosocial perspective, examining the causes and effects of crime on the biological, psychological, and social levels, as well as the interactions among those levels. Students learn, among other things, biological, psychological, family, neighborhood, and societal risk factors for crime; how criminals think; and how the tendency to commit delinquent and criminal acts develops in the individual.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000  and PSY 1100 .
  
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    CJ 3250 - Crime & Delinquency Prevention


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year.

    How can juvenile delinquency and adult crime be prevented? It’s not easy, but it’s not impossible. This course focuses on interventions (steps taken to facilitate change, also known as “programs” or “treatments”) that address some of the psychological and ecological causes of crime. While larger social forces are also important, they are generally out of the control of individuals or agencies seeking to accomplish tangible, measurable results. As we shall see, the focus on individuals and communities has achieved considerable success. Many interventions do indeed produce significant and lasting decreases in crime, and can be very cost-effective.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000  and CJ 3150 .
  
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    CJ 3300 - Community Based Corrections


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year. Also offered evenings.

    This course examines the philosophy of community-based corrections from historical, legal, social and psychological perspectives. The essence of probation and parole and their administration are considered in conjunction with criminal justice issues and practices that affect the court’s decision to allow community sanctions and supervision in lieu of incarceration. Contemporary trends and alternatives to traditional supervision are explored as well. A supervised practicum (20 hours per semester) is encouraged. This course is cross-listed as HMSV 3410 .

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 .
  
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    CJ 3333 - Crime in the Media


    3 cr. 3 hrs. Day course offered every other year. Also offered evenings.

    Ordinary Americans get much of their information about crime and the criminal justice system from mass media. Unfortunately, this information is full of distortions, leading to policies that themselves are based on these distortions that have very little chance of accomplishing their purposes. This course is designed to help students identify these distortions and their consequences, compare and contrast the public image and reality of crime, and consider the implications of these findings for criminal justice policy and practice.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 .
  
  
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    CJ 3750 - Colloquium


    3 cr. 3 hrs. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course seeks to integrate the student’s earlier work on theories of crime, types of crime, prevention and program assessment, while honing the student’s research and writing skills. The course involves intensive writing exercises, critical reading exercises, and critical analysis of research projects.

    Prerequisite(s): CJ 2000 .
  
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    CJ 4970 - Internship in Criminal Justice


    6 cr. Day course offered every Semester.

    Internship is the structured academic experience that allows senior CJ students who have successfully met eligibility criteria, to integrate and apply the skills and theory of the discipline in a field-based setting. Such an experience helps the student develop an understanding of the effects of administrative practices and governing policies on the ability to carry out the responsibilities of their field placement. Students participate in Internship the supervision of qualified professionals in CJ organizations. In addition to the field experience, students participate in a weekly seminar held by the university’s supervising professor. Here, students share their experiences and develop a heightened awareness of their roles in the organizations in which they are functioning. Students must have completed their prerequisites at least one semester before taking Internship and must pre-register with the Field Placement office in the beginning of the semester prior to the semester before they plan to enter an agency, (for example, students planning a fall placement must have completed their prerequisites by the end of the previous fall semester and pre-register with the Instructor early in the previous spring.) Students must meet CJ Internship eligibility requirement as determined by the Department of Behavioral Sciences.

  
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    CJ 4980 - Internship in Criminal Justice


    9 cr. Day course offered every Semester.

    Internship is the structured academic experience that allows senior CJ students who have successfully met eligibility criteria, to integrate and apply the skills and theory of the discipline in a field-based setting. Such an experience helps the student develop an understanding of the effects of administrative practices and governing policies on the ability to carry out the responsibilities of their field placement. Students participate in Internship the supervision of qualified professionals in CJ organizations. In addition to the field experience, students participate in a weekly seminar held by the university’s supervising professor. Here, students share their experiences and develop a heightened awareness of their roles in the organizations in which they are functioning. Students must have completed their prerequisites at least one semester before taking Internship and must pre-register with the Field Placement office in the beginning of the semester prior to the semester before they plan to enter an agency, (for example, students planning a fall placement must have completed their prerequisites by the end of the previous fall semester and pre-register with the Instructor early in the previous spring.) Students must meet CJ Internship eligibility requirement as determined by the Department of Behavioral Sciences.

  
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    CJ 4990 - Internship in Criminal Justice


    12 cr. Day course offered every Semester.

    Internship is the structured academic experience that allows senior CJ students who have successfully met eligibility criteria, to integrate and apply the skills and theory of the discipline in a field-based setting. Such an experience helps the student develop an understanding of the effects of administrative practices and governing policies on the ability to carry out the responsibilities of their field placement. Students participate in Internship the supervision of qualified professionals in CJ organizations. In addition to the field experience, students participate in a weekly seminar held by the university’s supervising professor. Here, students share their experiences and develop a heightened awareness of their roles in the organizations in which they are functioning. Students must have completed their prerequisites at least one semester before taking Internship and must pre-register with the Field Placement office in the beginning of the semester prior to the semester before they plan to enter an agency, (for example, students planning a fall placement must have completed their prerequisites by the end of the previous fall semester and pre-register with the Instructor early in the previous spring.) Students must meet CJ Internship eligibility requirement as determined by the Department of Behavioral Sciences.


Early Childhood, Elementary, and Middle School Education

  
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    EDUC 2300 - Foundations of Inclusive Education


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course gives a brief orientation on the developmental philosophy and goals of education. Students consider educational procedures used in facilitating the development of the child. They also explore the role of the teacher, the environment, and the appropriate instructional strategies to use with children. The impact of laws and litigation on the development of our current system will be traced. This course includes an examination of the theoretical and practical knowledge of the teaching/learning process. Students demonstrate competencies in the areas of planning, curriculum design, and evaluation. Focus is placed on the needs and learning styles of the early childhood, elementary, special education, and middle school child and the instructional strategies used to meet those needs effectively. In addition, classroom management skills and techniques are emphasized. A portfolio assessment (Tk-20) process is introduced in this course. A pre-practicum of 15 hours is required.  Required for all Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 1200  (may take this with EDUC 2300 if needed) PSY 1100  or PSY 2230  may be substituted if already taken.
  
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    EDUC 2600 - Developmentally Appropriate Practices and Programs for Young Children


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall.

    In line with federal legislation, candidates use a developmental approach in the areas of physical, emotional, social, creative, and cognitive growth to create appropriate environments and learning experiences to meet the needs of all children, typically progressing and those with special needs. Strategies for family and community involvement are explored. A pre-practicum of 15 hours is required.  Required for all Early Childhood Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Communication and Literacy MTEL. (Both Reading and Writing Subtests).
  
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    EDUC 2630 - Literacy in the Pre-K to 8 Classroom


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course looks in depth at the reading process and how children come to know and embrace literacy. Emergent literacy, reading strategies, and ways of developing both are examined, as are current approaches to the teaching of reading. Candidates are made aware of informal assessment measures for classroom use. A pre-practicum of 10 hours is required.  Required for all Early Childhood, Elementary, and Special Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Communication and Literacy MTEL. (Both Reading and Writing Subtests).
  
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    EDUC 2640 - Language Arts: Theory to Practice PreK-8


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course introduces the teacher candidate to the teaching and learning processes associated with comprehensive Language Arts instruction in the PreK–8 school setting. Emphasis is placed on the development of a knowledge base needed to assist the teacher candidate in making insightful decisions regarding objectives and practices. Current trends, research, and state and national standards will be included. Instruction will lead to teacher candidate knowledge, understanding and use of the core theories, and practices from reading, language, and child/adolescent development to teach reading, writing, speaking, viewing, listening, and thinking skills to PreK–8 students. A pre-practicum of 15 hours is required.  Required for all Early Childhood, Elementary, and Special Education: Moderate Disabilities PreK-8 and Severe Disabilities Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Communication and Literacy MTEL. (Both Reading and Writing Subtests).
  
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    EDUC 2850 - Investigations in Science & Social Studies in Early Childhood Education


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall.

    This course emphasizes the development and demonstration of instructional techniques and materials in science and social studies, which are appropriate for heterogeneous groups of young children. Curriculum standards and developmentally appropriate practices will be emphasized, with particular attention paid to the use of on-going assessment to gauge progress. Candidates will explore learning needs of young children with and without disabilities. A pre-practicum of 15 hours is required.  Required for all Early Childhood Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage One Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 2870 - The Art of Teaching Social Studies and Writing


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall.

    This course provides teacher candidates with the knowledge and methods to teach students social studies using a literacy-based approach. Candidates will learn about the interdisciplinary integration of history and the social sciences and how to engage students in literacy activities, predominately writing, in order to help students acquire the knowledge and processes of learning necessary to become active citizens. A pre-practicum of 15 hours is required.  Required for all Elementary Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage One Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 2910 - The Arts I: Inspiration


    1 cr. 1 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course examines theory and research involving creativity, the creative process, and creative thinking and problem-solving skills. This course also considers the elements, principles, methods, and materials of the arts and their relationship to core curriculum subjects. Activities are designed to enhance creativity and develop an understanding of the historical and cultural contexts of the arts. Required of all Early Childhood, Elementary, and Middle School (English, History, Mathematics or General Science Licensure Tracks) Education Majors. Middle School Education (Humanities or Math/Science Licensure Tracks) and Special Education: Moderate Disabilities PreK-8 and 5-12 and Severe Disabilities Majors may take this or EDUC 2920 

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage One Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 2920 - The Arts II: Imagination


    1 cr. 1 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course emphasizes development of skills and understanding of creating, performing, and responding within and through the arts. Developing personal creativity is explored and reflected on so that teacher candidates can model techniques and utilize strategies in their future classrooms. Understanding how to use a variety of assessment methods to evaluate what students know and are able to do is also investigated.  Required of all Early Childhood, Elementary, and Middle School (English, History, Mathematics, or General Science Licensure Tracks) Education Majors. Middle School Education (Humanities or Math/Science Licensure Tracks) and Special Education: Moderate Disabilities PreK-8 and 5-12 and Severe Disabilities Majors may take this or EDUC 2910 .

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage One Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 2930 - The Arts: Integration


    1 cr. 1 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course explores an interdisciplinary approach to teaching and learning. Opportunities for teacher candidates to make connections among the arts and with other disciplines within core curriculum are experienced. The course focuses on an authentic field-based component with children, Invitation to the Arts. This collaborative community experience involves planning, implementation, and assessing developmentally appropriate integrated arts activities. A pre-practicum of 5 hours is required.  Required for all Early Childhood, Elementary, and Middle School (English, History, Mathematics, or General Science Licensure Tracks) Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage One Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 2970 - Assessment for Instruction


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course provides elementary and middle school education majors with knowledge to understand and use formal and informal assessment strategies to plan, evaluate, and strengthen instruction that will promote continuous intellectual, social, emotional, and physical development of students in today’s schools. The course emphasizes the relationship between research and practice. It also provides a theoretical and practical basis for choosing and using the wide range of tests and measurements including observation.  A pre-practicum of 15 hours is required if course not taken in conjunction with EDUC 3740 . This course is also taken in conjunction with EDUC 3300  or EDUC 3480  and SPED 3720  Required for all Early Childhood, Elementary, and Middle School Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful passage of Stage I Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 3025 - Teaching English Language Arts & Literacy in Middle School


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered in the Fall.

    This course provides teacher candidates opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of effective middle school teachers of English Language Arts with a focus on the nature of language and language and literacy growth of young adolescents. Emphasis is placed on the meaning and importance of language arts and literacy, as well as on the characteristics of middle school students, which affect and are affected by the language arts and literacy program and which include: English Language Learners, young adolescents with disabilities and special needs, young adolescents from diverse socio-economic backgrounds, from diverse linguistic backgrounds, and from multicultural backgrounds. Elements of writing, speaking, listening, reading, viewing, and visually representing are stressed. Curricular approaches and instructional strategies of successful language arts and literacy programs are emphasized. A field experience is an integral part of the course. A pre-practicum of 20 hours is required.  Required for all Middle School Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful passage of Stage One Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 3026 - Teaching Math in Middle School


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered in the Fall.

    Candidates investigate methods and materials used in middle school mathematics programs. Candidates develop functional math skills for use by middle school teachers. This course will further develop candidates’ content knowledge and skills in regard to mathematical principles: set, function, probability and statistics, geometry, measurements, algebra, and computer awareness, to name a few. Candidates will practice application of such mathematical principles and develop mathematics curriculum, instruction, and assessment that will promote young adolescents’ knowledge and skills of these principles. Particular focus includes differentiating mathematics curriculum, instruction, and assessment for diverse groups of young adolescents. A field experience is an integral part of this course. A pre-practicum of 20 hours is required.  Required for all Middle School Education Mathematics-Science and Mathematics Education Licensure Track Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful passage of Stage One Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 3027 - Teaching Science in Middle School


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered in the Spring.

    This course provides teacher candidates opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of effective middle school teachers of science with a focus on contemporary thinking, practices, and research in the teaching of science to young adolescents. Emphasis is on providing innovative, hands-on experiences that incorporate the nature of science and inquiry and that provide differentiated learning experiences and assessment for English Language Learners; young adolescents with disabilities and special needs; young adolescents from diverse socio-economic backgrounds, from diverse linguistic backgrounds, and from multicultural backgrounds. Also covered will be analysis of contemporary issues in science and lab safety. A field experience is an integral part of the course. A pre-practicum of 20 hours is required.  Required for all Middle School Education Mathematics-Science and General Science Licensure Track Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful passage of Stage One Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 3028 - Teaching Social Studies in Middle School


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered in the Spring.

    The course investigates social studies content, strategies, and techniques deemed essential to fulfill varied curriculum requirements by exploring the integrative and interdisciplinary nature of the themes and disciplines of social studies. Candidates examine how to integrate instructional experiences that equalize educational opportunities for a diverse and inclusive student population and explore opportunities for enhancing multicultural pluralism. Additionally, this course assesses traditional as well as new technologies and their potential applications within the field of social studies education from a historical, theoretical, and practical perspective. A pre-practicum of 20 hours is required.  Required for all Middle School Humanities and History Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful passage of Stage One Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 3070 - Middle School Concept


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Spring.

    This course introduces students to the historical development, philosophy, and the competencies needed to teach in the middle school. A pre-practicum of 15 hours is required.  Required for all Middle School Education majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Communication and Literacy (Both Reading and Writing Subtests).
  
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    EDUC 3300 - Curriculum and Instruction in the Middle School


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall.

    This course introduces teacher candidates to curriculum development, instructional competencies, and appropriate goals and objectives for the middle school. A pre-practicum of 15 hours is required if course not taken in conjunction with EDUC 3740 . This course is also taken in conjunction with SPED 3720 Required for all Middle School Education majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful passage of Stage One Education Unit Review
  
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    EDUC 3440 - Science in Education


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall.

    This course covers contemporary thinking, practices, and research in the teaching of science to elementary school students. Emphasis is on providing innovative, hands-on experiences for students. The course will also use appropriate themes to integrate science with other subjects and teach methods that cater to the needs of students in inclusive classrooms. A pre-practicum of 15 hours is required.  Required for all Elementary Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Communication and Literacy MTEL. (Both Reading and Writing Subtests.)
  
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    EDUC 3480 - Teaching Math Effectively in Grades 1-6


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    Participants investigate methods and materials used in elementary school programs. Teacher candidates develop essential mathematical concepts and skills that they will use as elementary classroom teachers. This course includes information on how children develop knowledge about mathematical concepts. Participants will understand and be able to use different strategies to explain the meaning of mathematical concepts. A prepracticum of 15 hours is required if course not taken in conjunction with EDUC 3740 . This course is also taken in conjunction with EDUC 2970  and SPED 3720 Required for all Elementary Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage One Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 3740 - Onsite Immersion Field Experience


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    Facilitates the linking of college coursework to an intensive field-based experience of 125 hours in a classroom over the semester. Supervising practitioners (selected based upon their license and proven skills in their licensure area) and university supervisors guide, support, and evaluate candidate performance throughout the experience, which is graded as satisfactory or non-satisfactory. This course is taken in conjunction with EDUC 2970  or SPED 2970 , SPED 3510  or SPED 3720 , and SPED 3300 , SPED 3400 , or EDUC 3480 Required for all Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle School, and Special Education: Moderate Disabilities 5-12 and Severe Disabilities Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage One Education Unit Review and all concentration-required MTELs.
  
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    EDUC 4010 - Foundations Seminar


    3 cr. 3 hr.

    This course covers an examination of the historical perspectives and philosophical orientation in the field of elementary and middle school education. Specific attention is given to an analysis of current issues and programs in social foundation, legal foundation, curricular patterns and pluralism in Education. Required for Elementary Education practicum students (Fall 2011).

  
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    EDUC 4050 - Senior Seminar in Early Childhood Education


    4 cr. 5hr.

    This course covers an examination of the historical perspectives and philosophical orientation in the field of early childhood education. Specific attention is given to an analysis of current issues and programs. For senior practicum students only.

  
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    EDUC 4200 - Theories of Language and Second Language Acquisition


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    The course introduces current theoretical models of language acquisition focusing on literacy development and developing language skills. It is designed to provide students with an overall understanding of the importance of language development and language acquisition as seen in the education environment. Issues regarding first and second language development will be addressed. Students will focus on how theory and research relate to language instruction.

  
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    EDUC 4550 - Collaboration: Co-Teaching, Building Communities, and Working with Families


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course addresses collaboration and consultation in inclusive schools for teacher candidates in the Education Department. It also addresses building community in schools through theories of teaching and social supports. Lastly, a focus on professional and family relationships is explored through a family systems framework. This course is taken in conjunction with the student teaching practicum.  Required of all Education Department Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage Two Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 4862 - Practicum I in Early Childhood Education


    4.5 cr. Day course offered every Semester.

    Teacher candidates complete a practicum in an educational setting under the direction of a supervising practitioner who is certified in the area of licensure sought by the candidate and under the guidance of the university supervisor. This course is taken in conjunction with EDUC 4550 Required of Early Childhood Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage Two Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 4863 - Practicum II in Early Childhood Education


    4.5 cr. Day course offered every Semester.

    Teacher candidates complete a second practicum in an educational setting under the direction of a supervising practitioner who is certified in the area of licensure sought by the candidate and under the guidance of the university supervisor. This course is taken in conjunction with EDUC 4550 Required of Early Childhood Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage Two Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 4882 - Practicum in Elementary Education I


    4.5 cr. Day course offered every Semester.

    Teacher candidates complete a practicum in an educational setting under the direction of a supervising practitioner who is certified in the area of licensure sought by the candidate and under the guidance of the university supervisor. This course is taken in conjunction with EDUC 4550 Required of Elementary Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage Two Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 4883 - Practicum in Elementary Education II


    4.5 cr. Day course offered every Semester.

    Teacher candidates complete a second practicum in an educational setting under the direction of a supervising practitioner who is certified in the area of licensure sought by the candidate and under the guidance of the university supervisor. This course is taken in conjunction with EDUC 4550 Required of Elementary Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage Two Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 4885 - Practicum in Middle School Education I


    4.5 cr. Day course offered every Semester.

    Teacher candidates complete a practicum in an educational setting under the direction of a supervising practitioner who is certified in the area of licensure sought by the candidate and under the guidance of the university supervisor. This course is taken in conjunction with EDUC 4550 Required of Middle School Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage Two Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 4886 - Practicum in Middle School Education II


    4.5 cr. Day course offered every Semester.

    Teacher candidates complete a second practicum in an educational setting under the direction of a supervising practitioner who is certified in the area of licensure sought by the candidate and under the guidance of the university supervisor. This course is taken in conjunction with EDUC 4550 Required of Middle School Education Majors.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful Passage of Stage Two Education Unit Review.
  
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    EDUC 4903 - Independent Study in Education


    Day course offered every Semester.

    This course provides teacher candidates in early childhood, elementary, and middle school education with the opportunity to do research with staff guidance on a problem in education. The course is limited to juniors and seniors.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Department Chair.
  
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    EDUC 4975 - Directed Study


    1-6 cr. Day course offered every Semester.


Economics

  
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    ECON 1100 - Principles of Economics: Macroeconomics


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course is a study of the theory of employment, income and growth. Stabilization policy and current problems in American capitalism are emphasized. CTW

    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory completion of the University Mathematical Readiness requirement.
  
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    ECON 1200 - Principles of Economics: Microeconomics


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    Students examine the theory of the consumer and the business firm in this course. Efficiency in the allocation of resources is examined in four different market structures: pure competition, pure monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly. CTW

    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory completion of the University Math Readiness requirement.
  
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    ECON 1300 - Consumer Economics


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course emphasizes theories of consumption and economic functioning with emphasis on demand, consumer problems, standards of living, policies for protecting consumers and expanding consumption. This course is cross-listed as HIST 1300.

  
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    ECON 2140 - U.S. Economic History


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Spring.

    This course will take a panoramic view of the economic history of the United States, surveying the course of U.S. history from the early European settlement of the 1600s and 1700s up until the contemporary age of globalization, all from the perspective of and with an emphasis upon the economic matters that informed that history. This course is cross-listed as HIST 2140 . CTW

  
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    ECON 2300 - Industrial Organization


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year.

    This course integrates theory, empirical studies and case studies to analyze the effects of government regulations on the structure and organization of U.S. business firms. Several cases of antitrust legislation are studied. In addition, the course shows how political and economic issues affect industrial organization.

    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory completion of the University Mathematical Readiness requirement and ECON 1200 .
  
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    ECON 2400 - Money and Banking


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall. Also offered evenings.

    This course focuses on the role of money, credit and banking in the American economy. Special emphasis is placed on the applicability of monetary policy to the problems of economic stability.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 1100 .
  
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    ECON 2500 - Economic Development


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year.

    This course examines the problems of less developed countries. Topics of discussion include population, income growth, capital formation, unemployment, foreign investment and aid, the role of government and international economics.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 1100 .
  
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    ECON 2550 - Urban Economics


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year.

    This course is a historical and economic explanation of the growth of cities as well as a theoretical analysis of their location, form and economic structure. Current urban problems are also discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 1100 , ECON 1200 .
  
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    ECON 2600 - Public Finance


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Spring.

    This course studies the principle of governmental expenditures and revenues. Attention is also devoted to the problems of public debt, fiscal policy and inter-governmental fiscal relations, particularly in reference to the United States.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 1200 .
  
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    ECON 3000 - History of Economic Thought


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year.

    Within the framework of understanding the relationship between history and economic thought, this course covers the work of the great economists. Starting with the roots of economic thought in the works of the mercantilists and physiocrats, the course turns to the giants in political economy, including Adam Smith, David Ricardo, Karl Marx, Alfred Marshall and J. M. Keynes.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 1100  and ECON 1200 .
  
  •  

    ECON 3550 - International Economics


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered annually.

    This course explores the theories of international trade and their links to theories of economic development and growth. Major current topics in the international economy, including economic competition among countries, debt problems in the Third World and North-South relations, are treated as practical issues against which the theories can be tested.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 1100 , ECON 1200 .
  
  •  

    ECON 3600 - International Finance


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered annually.

    The course considers the theory and practice of financial management by governments, corporations and individuals in a changing international monetary environment. The course also discusses the influence of central governments, central banks, and international monetary institutions on interest rates, exchange rates, capital flows and financial stability.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 1100 , ECON 1200 .
  
  •  

    ECON 3650 - Intermediate Macroeconomics


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year.

    As a second course and more advanced treatment of macroeconomics, this course provides a detailed examination of major topics in macroeconomics. Topics of discussion include theories of consumption, investment, and growth recession, as well as efforts by the government to stabilize the economy through fiscal, monetary, or other measures. This course introduces the Keynesian, neo-classical and Marxian models of the macroeconomy.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 1100 , ECON 1200 .
  
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    ECON 3660 - Intermediate Microeconomics


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year.

    This course analyzes consumer and producer equilibrium in a market economy. The behavior of firms in the four market structures and the behavior of firms and individuals in input markets is examined. Applications of economic theory to concrete economic problems are emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): Satisfactory completion of the University Mathematical Readiness requirement, ECON 1200 .
  
  •  

    ECON 3700 - Econometrics


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every other year.

    This course is an introduction to econometric methods, statistical inferences and testing hypotheses. Model building techniques and their theoretical justifications are presented and evaluated in terms of their performance.

    Prerequisite(s): ECON 1100 , ECON 1200 ,   , MATH 2200 
  
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    ECON 4900 - Independent Study in Economics


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    The Independent Study is open to students who have the permission of the supervising instructor and the department. Course of study, meetings, and credit are arranged with approval.

  
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    ECON 4940 - Internship in Economics


    2 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    The Internship provides work experiences in private or public firms. Students acquire skills useful to professional economists.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing, 3.00 Econ. cum, or permission of internship coordinator.
  
  •  

    ECON 4975 - Directed Study


    1-6 cr. Day course offered every Semester.


English Studies

  
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    COMM 3010 - Introduction to Professional Communication


    3 cr. 3 hr. Offered annually.

    Introduction to Professional Communication is a portfolio-based course emphasizing the production of written, visual, and electronic media genres such as proposals, multimedia presentations, recommendation reports, info-graphics, blogs and other new media, typically for real world clients.

    Prerequisite(s): Writing I
  
  •  

    ENGL 0100 - Basic College Writing


    3 inst. cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course studies the process of writing as well as sentence arrangements and punctuation patterns in Edited American English. Credits do not count towards graduation.

  
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    ENGL 1100 - Writing I


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    Writing I provides the undergraduate student with the foundation necessary for critical thinking through academic and other professional writing. Students will cultivate the skills of argumentation, uses of evidence, analysis, close reading of texts, and revision as essential elements of the college-level writing process. ART

  
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    ENGL 1200 - Writing II


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    Expanding upon the argumentative and analytical emphases of Writing I, Writing II will foster research-based composition. In Writing II, students will demonstrate in prose their knowledge of rhetoric, employ a variety of research methods, and become familiar with latest information technologies. ART

  
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    ENGL 2000 - American Literature I: Age of Exploration to the Civil War


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    The significant texts of American literature from early Native-American oral narratives to Civil War texts in a variety of genres, including poetry, fiction, sermons, journals, letters, and other historical documents are surveyed. We examine how and why certain issues (such as American identity, Puritanism, cultural conflict, gender and racial equality) recur and evolve throughout early American literature. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  ,  .
  
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    ENGL 2100 - American Literature II: Civil War to the Present


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course surveys all genres of American writing from 1865 to the present, tracing the effects of social, economic, scientific and artistic turmoil on authors and their works. We explore the interconnections among succeeding eras of American literature: Realism, Modernism and Post-Modernism. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  ,  .
  
  •  

    ENGL 2200 - British Literature I: Beowulf to Milton


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course surveys English literature from the first extant manuscript materials through the early 17th century. We trace themes, images and literary forms that concerned British writers for half a millennium. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  ,  .
  
  •  

    ENGL 2210 - British Literature II: Pepys to Shelley


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This course explores the changing form of English literature during the most tumultuous period of English history, encompassing the civil wars and leading up to the Industrial Revolution. Selections include writings by Aphra Behn, Dryden, Swift, Pope, Gay, Anne Finch, and Equiano in the Neo-classical age, and Wordsworth, Charlotte Smith, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Byron and Mary Shelley in the Romantic age are explored. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  ,  .
  
  •  

    ENGL 2220 - British Literature III: Brönte to Rushdie


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course surveys British writers from the Victorian era to the present, tracing their responses to the revolutionary changes in art, music, science and social and economic classes. Representative authors include Dickens, Eliot, Trollope, Barrett-Browning, Wilde, Shaw, Woolf, Joyce and Beckett, authors whose depiction of human nature challenged contemporary concepts of self and society. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  ,  .
  
  •  

    ENGL 2300 - Literature and Disability


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course examines individual, family and societal images of disability through autobiography, biography, fiction, poetry and children’s literature. Students will explore themes around the disability experience using reflective writings, class discussions and activities. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  ,  .
  
  •  

    ENGL 2320 - Script Writing


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester.

    This basic course in script writing for film, television and multi-image productions includes information on the preparation of proposals, treatments, storyboards and scripts. Script formats include documentary, educational, corporate and dramatic film/video writing. (Credit is not given for both ENGL 2320 and COMM 2320.)

    Prerequisite(s):  ,  .
  
  •  

    ENGL 2323 - Digital Journalism


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Fall.

    What is the future of Journalism? Technology has given journalists new reporting tools and storytelling & strategies; it has also created an interactive news environment that has fundamentally changed the report’s relationship with the public. In this course, students practice digital storytelling skills, while exploring the social, commercial and technological shifts that have shaped the news media in recent years. The end result is a framework for understanding digital journalism’s emerging role in society.

    Prerequisite(s):  ,  .
  
  •  

    ENGL 2330 - Literature and Film


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course involves the critical study of literature and film as means to convey narratives. The conventions of various literary genres and types of films will be considered. Special attention is paid to the adaptation of novels and stories for the screen. Students study a dozen or more motion pictures in depth and compose six to eight critical essays. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  ,  .
  
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    ENGL 2340 - American Political Film and Literature: Conspiracies & Controversies


    3 cr. 3 hr

    This course introduces students to divisive American political controversies of the past century and equips them to analyze Hollywood’s representations of these pivotal events, as well as political discourse in literature. In particular, you will examine cinematic and literary portrayals of the political process, labor and class struggles, and real and imagined government conspiracies. This course is writing intensive; students will write several short film analysis papers, as well as two longer, researched analysis papers. ART, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  ,  .
  
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    ENGL 2400 - World Literature I


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered every Semester. Also offered evenings.

    This course presents a selection of major works from around the world, from ancient/classical traditions up to the 16th century. We examine shifts from oral to literate transmissions of various genres, including wisdom literature, epic and lyric poetry, drama, and narrative. Focus is on the Judeo-Christian and Greco-Roman foundations of Western literature, and on the Confucian, Hindu/Sanskrit, Buddhist, and Islamic underpinnings of literary traditions in Asia and the Middle East. The course examines the multiple, equally valid ways that different cultural and literary traditions respond to human experience. ART, GDAN, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  ,  .
  
  •  

    ENGL 2500 - World Literature II


    3 cr. 3 hr. Day course offered in the Spring. Also offered evenings.

    This course examines a selection of major works from the mid-17th century to the present. We cover a wide span of cultures, narratives and genres from the onset of modernity to the present, as we move from the literatures of China to Europe and modern Japan, South Asia and other locales. By setting up various cultures in conversation with each other, students understand the ways in which modernity shapes itself through considerations of gender, class and race narratives. ART, GDAN, LIT

    Prerequisite(s):  ,  .
 

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